Twirling Star Flimsy Finish

I have had such a fun time testing the Twirling Star pattern for Leanne at Devoted Quilter. The pattern is a combination of traditionally pieced and paper pieced blocks, which allows each technique to compliment the blocks perfectly.

Twirling Star Flimsy finishI did break one of my big rules of pattern testing, though, and did not follow the pattern exactly as written in one spot: I mitered the corners of the border. The pattern calls for a straight-edged border, but using this directional fabric, I feel like miter was necessary. Other than that little detail, I followed the pattern exactly. Go me!

twirling star quilt patternThis mini embodies some of my favorite aesthetic combinations these days. Low volume fabrics paired with black and whites with splashes of bright, rainbow colored fabrics. I love it!

twirling star quilt pattern

twirling star quilt patternI particularly like the rainbow pinwheels. Since they are paper pieced, the points fit together so well. The precision of paper piecing just can’t be beat!

rainbow pinwheel twirling star quilt patternI’m happy to check this flimsy finish off my list, and will post one more time when the pattern is ready to be released and I have this baby quilted and bound. I’m thinking I am going to go with a center spiral quilting pattern. I’ve never tried it before, and I think a mini quilt like this is the perfect place to start!

I’m linking up with Crazy Mom Quilts Finish it up Friday.

Color Inspiration Thursday {44}

This past weekend, my husband and I escaped for a long weekend getaway to the Bay of Fundy. It was our first trip alone together since our almost 5 1/5 year old daughter was born, and with another baby expected in the next month or so, it was most likely our last for another couple of years. A babymoon, if you will. We made the most of it and adventured more than we would be able to with little kids in tow, and relaxed more than we would be able to with little kids in tow. It’s all about balance.

bay of fundyThe Bay of Fundy is known for having the highest tidal range in the world. I’ve wanted to travel to the Bay of Fundy in Canada since my estuarine ecology studies in college. There’s something about 40 foot tides and vast mud flats that makes me happy. Our short timeframe and my 8 months pregnant body didn’t really allow for as much exploring as I’d have liked, but we had a great time anyway. Today I’ll be sharing some color palettes from photographs taken on our trip, created with Play Crafts’ Palette Builder 2.1.

bay of fundy color paletteCorresponding solids from left to right:
Kona Lake, Bella Etchings Charcoal, Kona Slate, Bella Navy, Kona Black, Bella Dusty Jade

Corresponding Aurifil thread from left to right:
2715 – Robins Egg
1158 – Med Grey
4140 – Wedgewood
2784 – Dk Navy
2692 – Black
2845 – Lt Juniper

Low tide on the Bay of Fundy means boats are grounded, many feet below the dock. I loved how the blue of the boat hull matched the sky.

red rocks bay of fundy color paletteCorresponding solids from left to right:
Bella Soft Finish Black, Bella Etchings Slate, Bella Tan, Bella Platinum, Kona Mocha, Kona Taupe

Corresponding Aurifil thread from left to right:
1285 – Med Bark
2625 – Arctic Ice
5011 – Rope Beige
2560 – Iris
2468 – Dk Wine
2375 – Antique Blush

The geology at the Bay of Fundy was decidedly red-brick colored. Between the red mud and the red rocks, there was a heavy theme of brick (marsala!?) in my photographs. The rocks exposed at low tide are shaped by the tides, the strength of the rocks, and the presence of the joints in the rocks. The rock in the cliffs the stacks are being cut from are arkosic sandstone and coarse poorly sorted conglomerates (thank you, Wikipedia–geologists, please correct me if I’m wrong!). We loved exploring caves carved into the soft red sandstone at St. Martin’s Caves. Isn’t the power of nature amazing!?

battered bay of fundy boat color paletteCorresponding solids from left to right:
Kona Black, Bella Lead, Bella Stone, Kona Crimson, Kona Teal Blue, Bella Caribbean

Corresponding Aurifil thread from left to right:
2692 – Black
1246 – Grey
2606 – Mist
2345 – Raisin
1310 – Med Blue Grey
2850 – Med Juniper

This boat has seen better days, but never have I seen one more full of character! I think because of the drastic change in tide each day, the sides of the boats moored to the dock get a beating. It’s still gorgeous, though!

Not only did color abound, but there was plenty of texture and pattern to be enjoyed as well.

battered rocks at the bay of fundyRocks as pocked and battered as this one littered the beach. I suppose this is what happens when 40 feet worth of tides come in and out each day, rolling and bashing the rocks against each other.

seaweedSeaweed. Gorgeous. This feathery seaweed covered the exposed rocks, creating a seascape of brown-green-red as far as the eye could see.

st johns city market gateI loved the gate at City Market in St. John’s. It’s a lovely balance of geometry and balanced aesthetic. Quilt inspiration is everywhere!

I’ll leave you with a good laugh. With a tendency to take a million photos, I wanted to be sure to have at least one of my husband and me together on our adventures, and an arms-length selfie just wouldn’t cut it. So of course, I set up a timer photo with the plan to run and join my husband for the photo like I always do. After three or four failed attempts, we decided that maybe the one who wasn’t 8 months pregnant should do the running. The first photo is my favorite fail, with the camera set by yours truly. The second photo is the first try with my husband setting the camera, successful with a good second to spare!

babymoon to the bay of fundy photo fail

babymoon at the bay of fundy

I’m linking up with Yvonne’s Thankful Thursday, since I’m thankful for our little escape. Spending time as a couple, while seemingly impossible with little kids, is so essential. I’m so glad we make the time to have together time on a regular basis now! (Did I mention that my husband encouraged me to take my sewing machine with us, and during the relaxing afternoon following our adventure I was able to do some sewing? Talk about gratitude!)

Embrace the Rainbow

Rainbows make me happy. As early as I can remember, I’ve enjoyed arranging things in rainbow order. In high school and college, I would always eat M&Ms in rainbow order. No exceptions. As a mom, putting colored pencils or crayons away in rainbow order fills me with a weird feeling of bliss. It’s no surprise, then, that rainbow order finds itself into so many of my quilts. For a while, I thought I would “grow out of” my penchant for rainbows. For some reason, in my mind, rainbow order isn’t as mature as, say… marsala, or gold. Then I had a little blog comment conversation via email with Jenn from A Quarter Inch from the Edge, where she pointed out, “Why does one need to get over a penchant for rainbows? We see them so rarely in real life… we’ve got to make a few of our own!” True that! And so, I have embraced my love of rainbows and I’m letting it shine! Here are two of my current works in progress as proof.

Twirling Star by Leanne at Devoted Quilter pattern testingI’m testing a pattern called Twirling Star by Leanne at Devoted Quilter. It has been fun getting feedback on Instagram about fabric choices along the way. I opted for an entirely low volume background, just switching up the background fabric for the outer pinwheels to help the center star stand out a bit more. Opinions were pretty evenly split between using this Botanics Foliage in Charcoal fabric versus using Ledger from Carolyn Friedlander’s Architextures line. As much as I LOVE Ledger (can you tell I love pretty much all things Carolyn Friedlander?), I was toying with the idea of spinning the outer rainbow pinwheels, but wanted the flexibility to make the decision after seeing the blocks. With Ledger, the directionality issue would have required that I make the decision before assembling the blocks. Foliage, it was!

twirling star rainbow pattern testing for leanne at devoted quilterNow I just need to sew these blocks together and add the borders and this mini quilt top will be finished!

prismatic medallion rainbow alison glass versionNext up is my progress on the Prismatic Medallion mini quilt I’m making for my partner in the Alison Glass Mini Quilt Swap. I definitely attribute my recent burst of rainbow to my purchase of the newest Alison Glass Sunprints. How could you resist making EVERYTHING with these fabulously bright and saturated fabrics!?

I’ve finally received all of the supplemental fabrics needed to fill out the black and white section, and all of the pieces are cut. Only the green and blue/turquoise triangles are sewn together so far. I’m really happy with the black and white triangle, and have come to accept the blue/purple triangle. I’m still debating the yellow/orange and the red/orange/magenta sections.

prismatic medallion alison glass version
Alison Glass handcrafted added in. I think it’s too brown for this palette.

In the yellow/orange triangle (beneath the black and white one), I originally bought a fabric from Alison Glass’ s Handcrafted line to vary the colors a bit. Now I’m thinking it may be too brown for this palette. I’m leaning toward the brighter Cotton & Steel basics yellow instead.

prismatic medallion alison glass version
Magenta-purple spread out a bit in the bottom triangle.

In the red/orange/magenta triangle (bottom center), I’m thinking I will spread out the purply magenta triangles a bit more. I’m thinking this bottom layout will be the final layout, with the C&S yellow and the spread out magenta. I need to decide soon and get this sewn together! What would you do?

embrace the rainbow

I’m linking up with Lee at Freshly Pieced for Work in Progress Wednesday.

 

 

Color Inspiration Thursday {43}

Meet Yvonne Fuchs, known as Quilting Jetgirl. I first met Yvonne in the New Quilt Bloggers Blog Hop hosted by Beth at Plum & June about a year ago. Since then, through blog comment exchange and other quilty interaction, we’ve become friends. I was fortunate enough to spend time with Yvonne in person at QuiltCon and I’m looking forward to many more quilting hang outs in our future, despite the fact that we live a country-width apart.

yvonne quilting jetgirl color palette

Corresponding solids from left to right:
Kona Pepper, Kona Tomato, Bella Longhorn, Kona Straw, Bella Pastel Blue, Kona Surf

Corresponding Aurifil thread from left to right:
4241 – V Dk Grey
2395 – Pumpkin Spice
2155 – Cinnamon
2320 – Lt Toast
2612 – Arctic Sky
2740 – Dk Cobalt

Today’s People Palette features Yvonne in front of her quilt Namibia Trees. The color play is fabulous, since who doesn’t want to pair bright reds & golds with royal blue!? Great choice in attire, Yvonne!

Yvonne is a big proponent of building and embracing the online quilting community, which is one of the many awesome things about her. She’s also not afraid to be real, and opens philosophical discussions about all things quilting and beyond. As she says on her blog, “Quilting is more than just a creative outlet for me. I want to pause and reflect on larger ideas to cultivate a community of discussion and insight.” You can read her philosophy discussion posts HERE. I particularly recommend The Four Agreements and Creativity and Time.

Quilting Jetgirl triangle-transparencyYvonne both creates custom quilts and designs quilt patterns, and recently released a gorgeous pattern called Triangle Transparency, which is currently available for sale in her CraftsyEtsy, and Payhip stores for $6 through Sunday, April 12th, which is a savings of 33% off of its regular price. Here are some more of my favorites from her recent quilts:

quilting jetgirl quilts
Top to bottom, left to right: Foothills Mystery Quilt, Love and Loss (Pantone quilt), Life: Ups and Downs, Tessellated Leaves

I asked Yvonne to answer three short questions to help the world get to know the color inspiration star of the week a little more intimately:

Where do you fit into the worldwide family tree of quilting?
I define my branch as the introverted, cat lady, quilter, blogger. I think I span between traditional and modern quilts in terms of style, but left to my own devices (aka with no commissioned quilts), I would lean heavier on the modern aesthetic.

What is the #1 most played song on your iPod?
I don’t know about song, but my favorite bands are Coldplay, Linkin Park, and Chevelle, and their songs are featured heavily in my music playlists. :)

What is your least favorite mode of transportation?
What an interesting question! That is really hard for me to answer. I love to walk, and I am amazed by cars, trains, and planes. I can get a bit motion sick in cars and boats, but a bit of planning ahead almost always solves that issue. I have only ridden a horse twice in my life, but both times were enjoyable experiences. Can I say riding a camel just because I never have (but I’d be willing to try!)?

I confirmed with Yvonne that she was choosing riding a camel as her least favorite mode of transportation, since she talked a lot about enjoyable transport, and she confirmed: I know it said LEAST favorite, and I guess I vote for riding a camel as least favorite (they spit, right?). I guess I just am super thankful I can still walk comfortably and I am amazed at modern contraptions to get me places faster than that.

Spit, they do! Thank you so much, Yvonne, for being my People Palette star!

You can find Yvonne in the bloggy quiltiverse here:

Blog
Instagram
Twitter
Facebook

Etsy

– – – – – – – – – – – – –

The color palette was created using Play Crafts’ Palette Builder 2.1 and a photo provided by Yvonne. All images were provided by Yvonne.

Bonnie Christine Ribbon Thread Catch & Pin Cushion {Tutorial}

Welcome to my stop on the Bonnie Christine Ribbon Blog Tour. We’re entering the final days of the tour, so be sure to check out the fabulous projects that have already been posted, including Caitlin Topham’s post at Salty Oat from yesterday, and visit the final stop on the tour, Corri Sheff at The Lions Dandy tomorrow to see what gorgeousness she creates.

promo2Bonnie Christine is a surface pattern designer, mother hen of the Roost Tribe and author of Going Home to Roost – a blog dedicated to living an extraordinarily creative life. She is inspired by the great outdoors and is passionate about sharing what she knows and creating community around creativity. Sing it, sister! These ribbons may seem familiar, since the coordinating fabrics in her Sweet as Honey fabric line inspired my very first wine and fabric pairing!

This line of ribbons was inspired by a love for nature and sunshine. They represent working in the garden, growing flowers and watching the bees, birds and butterflies take flight. This description embodies so much of what I hold dear, and when I saw that Bonnie Christine was looking for bloggers to help spread the word about her new line of ribbons, I knew I had to be a part of this blog tour.

I decided to create a weighted thread catch and matching detachable pin cushion so that these ribbons and fabrics can brighten up my sewing space forever. The ribbons are silky smooth and coordinate with Bonnie’s fabric lines Winged and Sweet as Honey, but truly they coordinate with many of her fabric lines and look AWESOME paired with coordinating solids.

ribbon thread catch and removable pin cushion

TUTORIAL- Ribbon Thread Catch and Pin Cushion

I’m super happy with how this thread catch turned out, and thought I’d share a tutorial with you so that you can make one, too! Special features of this Ribbon Thread Catch & Pin Cushion are:

  • Pin cushion is removable so that you can tote it from workspace to workspace;
  • Tile weight is removable, meaning you can be creative with what you use to weigh down the thread catch, and/or replace the tile if broken (I have a busy nearly-3 year old, so I’m anticipating at least one broken tile in my future);
  • Since both the pin cushion and tile can be removed, you can position the thread catch base underneath your machine for convenience if you want; and,
  • Double thick interfacing and the half-moon thread catch base create a wide open, but still reasonably sized space in which to toss your threads.

If you want to use Bonnie’s ribbons, too, you can buy them at Renaissance Ribbons or at Bonnie’s mom’s quilt shop A Stitch in Time. Here we go!

TUTORIAL- Ribbon Thread Catch and Pin Cushion

Ribbon Thread Catch and Pin Cushion Tutorial

First, gather your materials. General requirements are listed first; specific materials I used are in parenthesis. You will need:

Cutting Instructions

Please read all of the instructions before cutting. There are some time saving tips for working with interfacing in the “making the base and hanging tab” section.

For pincushion:
(Cut 1) 5.5″ x 5.5″ print
(Cut 1) 2.5″x5.5″ print
(Cut 2) 1.75″x5.5″ coordinating solid
(Cut 2) 5.5″ x 5.5″ batting

For base and hanging tab:
(Cut 2) 14.5″x5.5″ coordinating solid
(Cut 1) 14.5″x5.5″ stiff fusible interfacing (Pellon 808)
(Cut 1) 5.75″ accent ribbon (approximately)

For thread catch:
(Cut 1) 2″x17.5″ coordinating solid
(Cut 1) 4.5″x17.5″ print
(Cut 1) 6″x17.5″ lining fabric
(Cut 4) Ribbon Thread Catch bottom template:
– print fabric
– interfacing Pellon 101
– stiff interfacing Pellon 808
– lining fabric
(Cut 1) 6″x17.5″ stiff fusible interfacing (Pellon 808)
(Cut 1) 6″x17.5″ fusible interfacing (Pellon 101)

Assembly Instructions

Use 1/4″ seam allowances throughout.

Make the pincushion:

Step 1

pin cushion tutorial Sew 1.75″x5.5″ coordinating solid pieces to 2.5″x5.5″ print fabric as shown, pressing seams toward darker fabric. You should now have two 5.5″ squares.

Step 2

pin cushion tutorialLayer each 5.5″ square with a 5.5″ square of batting and quilt as desired (Note: Do not quilt in solid fabric, or keep in mind that the ribbon will be sewn on in the next step). Quilt the bottom (5.5″ print fabric) square fairly densely to help withstand the pull of velcro once in use. The top square needs minimal quilting.

Step 3

pin cushion tutorialTop stitch ribbon to both coordinating solids approximately 3/8″ away from the print fabric. Note: If you use a different width ribbon, you may want to adjust this distance. Keep in mind the 1/4″ seam allowances on the outermost edge.

Step 4

pin cushion tutorialAlign velcro approximately 1.5″ from each corner and top stitch securely. I stitched around each strip twice to ensure that it will withstand a lifetime of use. Note: Use the soft side of the velcro on the pincushion so that it doesn’t pick up thread and fuzz and everything when you move it around your workspace. The hooked side of the velcro will be sewn onto the base.

Step 5
Right sides facing, sew around all edges leaving a 3″ opening in one side. (Leaving the opening in the side will make for much less visible closing stitches after stuffing)

Step 6

pin cushion tutorialpin cushion tutorialTrim corners and turn right-side out.  Stuff to the gills with stuffing of choice (I recommend 100% wool batting–the stuffing kind, not batting like we use between layers of a quilt–or crushed walnut shells to help keep your pins and needles clean and rust-free).

Step 7

pin cushion tutorialFold in edges around opening and pin or finger press closed. Using a blind stitch (or visible whip stitch), hand stitch closed using coordinating thread.

pin cushionAdmire your pincushion! Set aside while you make the rest of the thread catch.

Make the base and hanging tab:

Step 1 *time saving tip*

Thread Catch Base & Hanging Tab Step 1Cut the 14.5″x5.5″ piece of stiff fusible interfacing (Pellon 808). Following the instructions on the interfacing, fuse to wrong side of coordinating fabric (fabric is uncut at this point).

Step 2

2Once interfacing cools, fold fabric in half and use rotary cutter and ruler to cut around the 14.5″x5.5″ interfacing. You will end up with two perfectly sized fabric pieces with the interfacing fused to one of them.

Step 3

step three thread catch tutorial base and hanging tabWith right sides facing (interfacing out), sew along long sides with a 1/4″ seam. Set seams, turn right side out, press.

Step 4

thread catch tutorial base and hanging tab stepFold in 1/4″ from one short edge. Press.

Step 5

thread catch tutorial base and hanging tab stepFold in again, 3/4″. Press.

Step 6

thread catch tutorial base and hanging tab stepFold long end 5″ from pressed edge, over on top of itself. Press.

Step 7

thread catch base and hanging tab directionsWith the folded portion facing away from you, and the unfinished long end facing down, position the velcro strips 1 1/4″ from each top corner. Pin in place.

Step 8

thread catch base and hanging tab directionsTopstitch the velcro in place, being careful to only sew through one layer of fabric (the portion that was pressed under will be folded up out of the way.) I stitched around each velcro strip twice to ensure the velcro stays in place even with frequent use.

Step 9

thread catch base and hanging tab directionsRefold according to directions above. Sew along long edges only, using a 1/4″ seam allowance.

tile pocket imageYou have just created a tile pocket. I have seen some thread catches weighted with completely sewn-in tiles, but decided to design this with an opening where the tile can be inserted or removed as needed. This means that you can use anything you want to weigh down your thread catch, and if you have a little “helper” who happens to smash it to the ground, you can take out the tile shards and replace with a new tile. Once your tile is inserted, you can pull the little lip of fabric over the end of it to hold it in place more securely (like those fancy pillow cases). Don’t insert your tile yet–we’re still sewing! Now you know how the tile pocket will work, and hopefully can visualize where we are going with this a little better.

Step 10

thread catch pin cushion tutorialAlign accent ribbon 1 1/2″ from the unfinished short edge of the top of the base. Note: The ribbon shown is longer than 5.75″ and I trimmed the edges before the next step. Yours should fit well, with a bit over 1/2″ overhang on each side.

Step 11

thread catch pin cushion tutorialFold excess ribbon over the edges twice (Fold so that the cut end meets the edge of the base, and then fold over again). Pin in place.

Step 12

thread catch pin cushion tutorialTopstitch ribbon in place using coordinating thread. Your base is now finished, ready to attach to the thread catch basket. Set it aside while you make the thread catch.

Make the thread catch & Final Assembly:

Step 1

thread catch tutorialGather your cut pieces and interfacing. Normally, I would suggest cutting the interfacing, pressing to fabric, and THEN cutting out the outer fabric pieces around the interfacing, but since we will be sewing the print fabric to the coordinating solid before fusing to the interfacing, I would suggest cutting it all in advance. If you want to take a little shortcut, you can use the Ribbon Thread Catch bottom template to cut out the interfacing bottom, fuse to the print fabric and then cut the fabric once the interfacing is fused.

Step 2

thread catch tutorialSew the 2″x17.5″ coordinating solid to the 4″x17.5″ print fabric, pressing the seam toward the darker fabric. This is the outer panel of the thread catch.

Step 3

thread catch tutorialFollowing the instructions on the fusible interfacing, fuse both layers of interfacing to the wrong side of the outer panel, and to the thread catch bottom. Note that if using Pellon 101 and 808, you should fuse the 101 first since it calls for a damp press cloth and steam. Once fused and cool, then fuse the 808 for added structure. Note: Be sure to use a press cloth or other scrap fabric beneath and above your fabric and interfacing to protect your iron. Interfacing melted onto the iron is no fun!

Step 4

thread catch tutorialAlign the ribbon 3/8″ from the print fabric and topstitch in place. Note: If you are using a different width of ribbon, you may want to adjust this distance. Keep in mind the 1/4″ seam allowance at the top of the thread catch! You can use either coordinating or contrasting thread depending on the look you’d like to achieve. I opted to use Aurifil 50wt 2015 – Aluminum for the entire project. It seems to go with everything, in my opinion!

Step 5

thread catch tutorialFind the center of the outer panel (8.75″ from an edge) and pin. Note that in the photo, I pinned the top of the panel. You should pin the bottom of the panel instead. (Oops)

Step 6

thread catch tutorialRight sides together, sew short ends of the outer panel together. Be sure to line up the ribbon and seams, pinning right next to the join for accuracy. Press seam open.

Step 7

thread catch tutorialMark the center of your interfaced thread catch bottom (folding in half and creasing lightly to find the center point works wonderfully). Align the center of the bottom to the bottom seam of your outer panel. Be sure that right sides are facing away from you (you should be looking at a whole lot of interfacing) and also be sure that you are attaching your bottom to the bottom of the thread catch body (the ribbon is on the top).

thread catch tutorialPin right sides together.

Step 8

thread catch tutorialUsing the bottom of the thread catch as your reference and making sure it is lined up with the outer panel, sew along the straight edge of the bottom. Be sure to start and stop 1/4″ from both corners, backstitching at the beginning and end of your stitches.

Step 9

ribbon thread catch tutorialHere’s where that center-marking pin comes in handy! First, clip the curves on the bottom. Then, align the center of the bottom with the pin marking the center of your thread catch body, right sides together. Pin.

Step 10

ribbon thread catch tutorialContinue to pin the bottom to the thread catch body, working from the center out, aligning the edges as best you can.

ribbon thread catch tutorialFor the corners, fold as if you were turning a corner while binding, and pin securely. Sew together, beginning in the center and working out toward the corners. To keep the corners crisp, I stopped about 1″ short of each corner, backstitched, cut my thread, and began again starting in the corner, sewing out to meet the spot where I left off. If you’re a pro at curves and 3D sewing, feel free to do what works for you! Press seams toward thread catch body if possible.

Repeat steps 6-10 for thread catch lining, disregarding the ribbon-specific bits.

ribbon thread catch tutorialYou will now have the fully sewn outer body and liner for the thread catch! On to the final assembly!

Step 11

Turn outer thread catch body right side out. Slip the lining over the outer thread catch body, aligning raw edges, right sides together. Line up the center seams and back panels.

Step 12

ribbon thread catch tutorialPin in place and sew along top open edge, leaving an opening at least 5.5″ wide along the back panel (you can use your thread catch base and hanging tab to make sure there is enough space, but remove it before sewing. I found that it was easiest to sew together with the outside facing up.) Backstitch at the start and finish of your stitching to hold stitches during turning.

Step 13

Turn right side out through the opening in the top. Push lining down into the outer body. Press top edge, tucking in raw edges of the opening and pressing well.

ribbon thread catch tutorialribbon thread catch tutorialYou now will have the thread catch body fully assembled, with an opening along the back top, flat edge.

Step 14

ribbon thread catch tutorialInsert the raw edge of the thread catch base and hanging tab into the space left open in the thread catch body. It should be inserted 1/2″ into the body, leaving 1″ between the thread catch and the accent ribbon on the hanging tab. Pin.

ribbon thread catch tutorialTip: Check the back to make sure that the back raw edge is properly tucked in before sewing.

Step 15

Sew along top edge, sewing the hanging tab into the thread catch body. I sewed the opening closed (with the hanging tab inside) first, with the thread catch body & lining facing up so that my top stitches show and I could control the seam distance better.

Thread Catch Step 15Next, top stitch along the entire top of the thread catch opening using a scant 1/4″ seam. Once the hanging tab was securely sewn in, I backstitched and cut my thread, again flipping the thread catch the other way (outside of the thread catch facing up) so that I could ensure that my top stitches are even since they are the ones that show.

You’re finished!!

Go ahead and put your pile of threads accumulated during the making of this project into your gorgeous new thread catch!

thread catch tutorial

TUTORIAL- Ribbon Thread Catch and Pin Cushion

Phew! Congratulations, you made it! I sure hope that this tutorial/pattern is clear, and please let me know if you have any questions or comments. I would love to see if you make this, too. Please tag me @nightquilter if you post on Instagram or Twitter.

Thank you so much to Bonnie Christine for including me in this blog tour, and be sure to check out Caitlin Topham’s post at Salty Oat from yesterday, and visit the final stop on the tour, Corri Sheff at The Lions Dandy tomorrow to see what gorgeousness she creates.

I’m linking up with Late Night Quilter’s Tips & Tutorials Tuesday & Crazy Mom Quilts Finish it up Friday.

 

April Goal {ALYoF}

When I first decided to participate in this year’s A Lovely Year of Finishes (ALYoF), I sketched out a general plan of projects and works in progress for the year. April, being my birthday month, was designated “selfish sewing month” and I had planned to work on–or finish!–the quilt I am making just for me. But lo, as life goes, other projects have due dates and take precedence over selfish sewing. My sister-in-law is expecting her first child, a daughter, and her baby shower is at the end of April. This bumps her baby quilt to the top of the pile. So far, all I’ve done is pull fabrics from my stash to begin planning this quilt.

fabric pull for hazel hedgehog baby quiltI’m planning to make a baby quilt using a giant pink Hazel Hedgehog with a teal background. My sister-in-law is all about pink… I mean ALL about pink… so the pink heavy Hazel will be perfect for her.
Since I have yet to even begin this project, I’m hoping to finish just the quilt top by the end of April. I’m taking it easy on myself for a change, with a hopefully easily attainable goal. She isn’t due until June, so I’m thinking a quilt top will be an acceptable gift to present at her shower, and quilting and finishing should be attainable before my baby joins us sometime in May, or maybe June.

fabric pull for hazel hedgehog baby quiltI haven’t fully decided on pink placement for this quilt yet. I’m torn between using the light pink as the face, the grey as the body, and then a brighter pink (or combination of brighter pinks) for the hair OR using the light pink for the face, the darker pink solid for the body and an even darker pink (maybe the bottom one, or perhaps a mix of the middle two pinks) for the hair.

fabric pull for hazel hedgehog baby quiltI like the look of the grey mixed in, but I’m not sure if that’s just my style preferences leaking in, or if it really would look better with the grey body. If you haven’t seen a Hazel Hedgehog, here are a lot of great examples made during Angie at Gnome Angel’s Hazel Hedgehog Quilt Along held last month. While the Quilt Along has ended, there is a ton of great inspiration there! What would you do with your pink Hazel?

gnomeangel-banner-hazel-hedgehog-quilt-a-long

I’m linking up with the April Goal Setting Party with ALYoF, and with Monday Makers.

Balance

The internet has been down for most of the week here at home, which translates to radio silence on this here blog. My goal for the year was “Balance”, after all, so maybe it was decided that I needed to take a blogging break. Either way, here’s a little peek at what I’ve been doing during the silence.

visible mending

I mended my first pair of jeans. Yes, I know, it’s a little embarrassing that as an almost-34 year old, I have yet to mend clothes. I did try mending a hole in a pair of jeans a couple years back, but it was such an epic fail I can hardly count it. This time I used a patch cut from another pair of old holey jeans, zig zag stitched the edges to prevent fraying, and hand stitched it on with Aurifil floss. Many thanks to Dorie (@tumblingblocks on IG) for the inspiration and tips! The floss was gorgeous to work with, but I was later informed (thanks for the heads up, Sam!) that embroidery floss won’t be strong enough to hold up well as a jeans knee patch. I plan to supplement the stitching with a rainbow of perle cotton and hope for the best. At least it looks awesome, and these favorite post-partum maternity-esque jeans are ready to wear post-baby. It is so peaceful to sit and stitch while sitting next to my kiddos watching a movie. Balance, right?

skinny fabric scraps for the birds

I put my skinny strip scraps outside for the birds. I’ve never tried this before, but have seen that others save their fabric shavings to put out during nest-building season. I’ve been saving my skinnies all winter so I’m really hopeful that we see some colorful, soft nests around the yard this year!

alison glass prismatic medallion mini quilt progress

I’ve been working on my Prismatic Medallion mini quilt for my Alison Glass Mini Quilt swap partner. I’m still waiting on a few fabrics, but I’m loving the progress so far!

bean sprout foundation paper piecing pattern

I made a bit of progress on my newest foundation paper piecing pattern, Bean Sprout. Can you tell my mind is on spring?

planting seeds

We finally planted seeds. Today, April 3rd, we FINALLY got seeds into planters. It’s far too cold to plant seeds in the ground still, especially since there are still multiple feet of snow on top, but starting seeds inside is one of my favorite parts about spring. It felt so good to get dirt under my fingernails! Last year, we planted seeds in late February, so waiting until April is crazytown. This winter was just so brutal it felt wrong to plant seeds when the temperatures were in the teens and the snow just kept coming. I’m hoping the seeds still get a good enough head start to flourish once the garden is ready for them.

Back outside I go to enjoy this glorious day with my kids. The weekend forecast is for more snow (it darn well better not stick!), but I know that spring is near. Hope, balance, love. That’s what life is about!

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