Tag Archives: aurifil

Stitching on the Go: EPP & Visible Mending

I don’t travel often, and when I do, I usually have three kids in tow who demand quite a bit of my attention, so traveling solo to and from QuiltCon early last month was quite a treat. Even with layovers, long flights, and all-day travel days, it seemed like I was on vacation traveling solo. Well, okay, I WAS on vacation… but you know what I mean! All the free time meant that I made a lot of progress with my hand stitching, which I want to finally share with you today.

travel stitching progress EPP mandolin quilt blockI headed off to QuiltCon with an English Paper Piecing (EPP) project–the Mandolin Quilt Block by Jodi at Tales of Cloth. I had gotten a bit further than my last blog update on this project, but I still had the entire outer ring to baste and stitch on, as well as some of the inner colored segments to attach. EPP is my favorite travel stitching project at the moment, since it’s compact, fun, and easy to pick up and put down. I also don’t seem to be tiring of rainbows and high contrast, so hopefully you’re not getting bored, either!

As you can see, I was able to completely finish stitching my Mandolin Quilt block during my travels, which means this is next in line to become an awesome pillow right behind its Moonstone brother. I used Alison Glass fabric in that saturated stunning rainbow for which she’s so well known, and threw in some fun meticulously cut Libs Elliott fabrics from her True Love line for Andover Fabrics for contrast. I stitched it together using Aurifil monofilament thread in smoke, which meant I didn’t need a headlamp for precision on the poorly lit plane, yet you still can’t see any of the stitches. Bonus!

travel stitching visible mendingWhile I was traveling, the mending on my most-worn jeans began to wear through, but fortunately I was able to pick up a mending kit from the Brooklyn Haberdashery booth at QuiltCon, and I stitched on a new patch during my travels home. I love the texture on this patch, and also am kind of loving the mending of mending layered play between the stitches on the original mending and the stitches on the new.

travel stitching visible mendingI used the 12wt Aurifil thread I had with me to stitch on the new patch, whip stitching the full edge in place and then used simple vertical running stitches to secure the patch further. These jeans contain a bit of stretch, which is part of why they are wearing through so quickly, but also means that there’s a good clear Kitty-knee worked into them. That knee mountain makes me laugh, but gosh are these jeans comfortable!

travel stitching progress EPP and visible mendingMy long flight back to NJ after QuiltCon allowed me to finish both of these hand stitching projects, which felt pretty amazing since I typically make progress at a snail’s pace.

I’m still working on my QuiltCon Reflections post, but hope to be sharing that soon. Spoiler: Finishing these projects was the icing on the cake of a wonderful trip.

Modern Plus Sign Quilts Book Blog Hop

I’m excited to be leading off the Modern Plus Sign Quilts book blog hop, celebrating my friends Cheryl and Paige’s new book published by Stash Books/C&T Publishing. Cheryl Brickey of Meadow Mist Designs and Paige Alexander of Quilted Blooms are two talented designers who have a knack for writing clear and concise instructions, and their newest book is no exception.

modern plus sign quilts book With 16 diverse patterns including a variety of techniques including traditional piecing, applique, and foundation paper piecing, this book is a great resource for quilters of all levels of experience. For the next few weeks, be sure to follow along with the Modern Plus Sign Quilts Book Blog Hop to see makes using all of the versatile patterns in their book, and to enter to win a bunch of fun prizes. Pst… you could win an Aurifil thread set today, so be sure to head over to enter!

modern plus sign quilts book signature plus zippered pouchAs part of the hop, I got to play with the Signature Plus pattern, and opted to make a large open wide zippered pouch using the free pattern by Anna Graham of Noodlehead. I knew that February would be completely packed with QuiltCon prep, so this large pouch was a great way to show off the versatility of the blocks and patterns in Modern Plus Sign Quilts, while also ensuring I would have time to finish my project!

signature plus quilt prepOne thing I love about the Signature Plus pattern is that it’s designed as a pattern well suited to group quilts, inspired by Red Cross signature block quilts from the early twentieth century. You can read more about the history of Red Cross quilts here–so interesting!

Photo credit: C&T Publications, from Modern Plus Sign Quilts

Because it’s designed for group quilts, not only are the cutting instructions for Signature Plus provided for the quilt as a whole, but there are also single block cutting instructions so that if you make it as a bee block quilt or group quilt, the individual quilt block math is already done for you and easily laid out. Cheryl and Paige thought of everything!

Photo credit: C&T Publications, from Modern Plus Sign Quilts

For my large zippered pouch, I used one of the smaller plus sign blocks from the pattern as the focal block. I pulled some repurposed black leather, some Essex linen in charcoal, and some scraps of Oakshott deep red shot cotton from my stash, bought the perfect zipper from my local quilt shop Fiddlehead Artisan Supply, and dove in.

modern plus sign quilts book signature plus zippered pouchI used 50wt Aurifil 2692-Black to assemble the plus block and pouch, and 40wt 2230-Red Peony to quilt over the plus sign to give it a bit of punch.

modern plus sign quilts book signature plus zippered pouch alison glass liningI was excited to find some Alison Glass Handcrafted fabric that was the perfect pouch lining, too. I always love when I can use some much loved fabric from my stash in its perfect project.

modern plus sign quilts book signature plus zippered pouch zipperWhile zipper installation isn’t fearfully new for me, I’m still not a pro, so I’m excited at how well this zipper went in.

modern plus sign quilts book signature plus zippered pouch upcycled leatherSewing with leather for this project was much trickier than when I used leather in basic quilt blocks, simply because the bottom seam joins ended up being four layers thick. I admittedly did not use heavy duty leather sewing machine needles, so that could be why my workhorse Bernina 560 couldn’t make it through and instead skipped stitches. I ended up hand stitching about an inch or two of each center bottom seam, which worked just fine. I’m proud of how well everything aligns, though, since bag sewing is not something I do very often!

modern plus sign quilts book signature plus zippered pouch zipper pullEven the little detail on the zipper pull makes me happy. It’s the little details, right?modern plus sign quilts book signature plus zippered pouch The largest size of pouch fit the plus block from the Signature Plus quilt pattern perfectly, and I think it will make a great, sleek and elegant first aid kit. It’s large enough to fit all of the first aid kit supplies needed for a busy and active family with three adventurous little ones, even the bulk sized box of Band-Aids! I like to think it’s a mature, cool looking first aid kit. Right? Humor me!modern plus sign quilts book signature plus zippered pouch I noticed that I even have the “Quiltvent” variety of bandaids–how perfect!! To be honest, when I first planned to make this First Aid style zippered pouch, I fully intended to stuff it full of first aid supplies and keep it handy on family adventures.

modern plus sign quilts book signature plus zippered pouch Now that it’s finished, though, I might just keep it for myself, filled with a secret stash of chocolate. Shhhh don’t tell the kids!

You can get a signed copy of the Modern Plus Sign Quilts book from either Cheryl’s Meadow Mist Designs Etsy Shop or Paige’s Quilted Blooms Designs Esty Shop , or unsigned copies can be purchased on Amazon, from C&T Publishing, or from a number of other domestic and international sources.

Be sure to check out the other gorgeous Signature Plus makes today, as well as all of the other stops along the Book Blog Tour:


Monday, March 12th
Cheryl @ Meadow Mist Designs
Paige @ Quilted Blooms

Tuesday, March 13th
Soma @ Whims and Fancies
Ann @ Brown Paws Quilting
Kitty @ Night Quilter <—YOU’RE HERE
Sophie @ Luna Lovequilts
Afton @ Quilting Mod
Shelley @ The Carpenters Daughter Who Quilts

Wednesday, March 14th
Jayne @ Twiggy and Opal
Jen @ A Dream and a Stitch
Abigail @ Cut & Alter
Yvonne @ Quilting Jetgirl
Sandra @ mmm! quilts
Karen @ Run Sew Fun

Thursday, March 15th
Linda @ Flourishing Palms
Bernie @ Needle and Foot
Liz @ Savor Every Stitch
Stacey @ Stacey In Stitches
Michelle @ From Bolt to Beauty
Patty @ Elm Street Quilts
Melanie @ A Bit of Scrap Stuff Blog

Friday, March 16th
Myra @ Busy Hands Quilts
Izzy @ Dizzy Quilts
Ruth @ Charly and Ben’s Crafty Corner
Christa @ Christa Quilts

Monday, March 19th
Jessica @ Quilty Habit
Cindy @ Hyacinth Quilt Designs
Jennifer @ The Inquiring Quilter
Julie @ The Crafty Quilter

Tuesday, March 20th
Tish @ Tish N Wonderland
Judy @ Sew Some Sunshine
Emily @ The Darling Dogwood
Wanda @ Wanda’s Life Sampler
Karen @ Tu-Na Quilts, Travels, and Eats
Katherine @ Sew Me Something Good

Wednesday, March 21st
Anja @ Anja Quilts
Kate @ Smiles from Kate
Sue @ Sevenoaks Street Quilts
Carole @ From My Carolina Home
Alison @ Little Bunny Quilts

Thursday, March 22nd
Debbie @ Esch House Quilts
Laura @ Slice of Pi Quilts
Beth @ Cooking Up Quilts
Janice @ Color Creating and Quilting
Joanne @ Quilts by Joanne

Friday, March 23rd
Cheryl @ Meadow Mist Designs
Paige @ Quilted Blooms

Many congratulations to both Cheryl and Paige on a wonderful book! I look forward to seeing everyone’s plus sign quilt creativity blossom as a result!

I’m going to link up with Let’s Bee Social, Crazy Mom Quilts’ Finish it up Friday, and TGIFF since it’s been ages since I’ve had a finish to share!!

Happy sewing!

Mandolin Quilt Block Progress, My Newest Rainbow EPP

I haven’t been able to escape the sew-in-rainbows bug, but I admit I haven’t been trying too hard to escape it! Now that my Moonstone Quilt pillow is in basting, quilting, and finishing mode, I’ve begun a new English Paper Piecing project to have on the ready for any travel stitching that might arise. The Mandolin Quilt pattern by Jodi at Tales of Cloth will be the next addition to my rainbow and black and white quilted pillow collection, and I thought I’d share my progress.

mandolin quilt beginnings alison glass rainbow eppI’m using *gasp* Alison Glass fabrics for the rainbow, with the center cameo from an Art Theory panel from her Ex Libris line and a couple of rounds of Sun Print 2018 before diving into her older lines. I’m also adding Libs Eliott fabrics as a black and white zap to the vibrant rainbow. Both Alison and Libs design for Andover Fabrics, so I feel like they can be buddy buddy quite happily in the same project. Plus, my husband’s favorite fabric designer is Libs Elliot, so this pillow will have both of our favorites included, and will coordinate wonderfully with my Alison Glass Moonstone pillow (once it’s finished) and Gare’s Libs pillow.

choosing fabrics alison glass rainbow epp mandolin quiltI have a highly technical approach to selecting fabrics when it comes to a project like this. I place my center on the floor, surround it with all of the Alison Glass fabrics I can find, and then play.

auditioning alison glass fabrics epp mandolinI audition fabrics not only in person, but also through the screen of my phone’s camera, since oddly, some fabric arrangements look different from afar. Alison makes it pretty easy since her fabrics are such a vibrant spectrum of tone on tone color that already transition so well through the rainbow. It’s still fun to decide where to put each bright little bit, and mixing fabrics from new and old fabric lines.

tales of cloth acrylics mandolin eppI love English Paper Pieced patterns that have acrylic templates, since I’m a big fan of meticulous cutting (aka fussy cutting). These Mandolin templates help me see exactly what section of each fabric will be showcased in the quilt and which will be included in the seam allowance. It makes the basting step a lot easier, since the work is done in the cutting!

meticulous cutting progress mandolin tales of clothEven with a project focused on the color flow and not so much the individual pieces, I still fit meticulous cutting in where I can. You *might* notice that the squares around the center are all meticulously cut from Compass from Sun Print 2018, alternating designs since I only had fat eighths of the fabric, which didn’t include a full repeat of the design. The triangles are also meticulously cut, alternating between Latitude from Diving Board and Link from Sun Print 2017.

Once I extended beyond those triangles, the meticulous cutting is less consistent, since I focused more strongly on color flow around the circle.

mandolin quilt beginnings alison glass rainbow eppI’ve been using Aurifil monofilament thread in smoke to stitch these together, which makes the process a little bit quicker since the thread is essentially invisible and I don’t take *quite* as long with my meticulously tiny stitches, since I’m less worried about it showing on the front. I can definitely see why so many folks stitch EPP together with monofilament. It’s a bit more fiddly in hand, and a bit tougher to sew with because of its invisibility, but I think the result is well worth the effort.

I made pretty consistent progress on this Mandolin block in January, stitching here and there, and taking advantage of rare quiet moments to stitch a bit. Early last week, though, QuiltCon prep began to overtake every free moment, and I’m admittedly still in the thick of it. I’m very excited to be co-teaching four classes with my friend Michelle Bartholomew (two each of Quilt Photography Basics, and two of Advanced Quilt Photography), as well as giving a lecture on Quilts to Mark Milestones Sunday morning at the event. I’ve been working hard to get everything perfect, and am very excited that in just over a week, I will be beginning my trek to get to Pasadena.

The one positive to my not being able to make much additional progress on my Mandolin block these past weeks is that now I will have a perfect hand-stitching project to take with me for the flights and any airport waiting time. Hopefully I will be returning from Pasadena not only with a feeling of class and lecture success, shared and gained inspiration, and a refreshed tank of quilty friend time, but also a nearly or fully finished Mandolin block!

Who will I see in Pasadena? If you’re headed to QuiltCon and see this bright thang in the airport or along your way, please do stop and say hi!

Panache Mini Quilt Finish: Superbolt!

A few months ago, my friend Rebecca Bryan from Bryan House Quilts asked me if I wanted to play with her new Panache fabric, her premier line for Robert Kaufman Fabrics. One look at the fabric line, and I was sold. Of COURSE I wanted to play with it!

superbolt mini quilt panache fabric I’ve been wanting to create a pattern exclusively for newsletter subscribers, and as I played around with simple and fun mini quilt/pillow patterns, this one jumped out at me. You could say it electrified me. Inspired by lightning, the Superbolt Mini Quilt came to be.

A superbolt is a bolt of lightning around a hundred times brighter than normal. On Earth, one in a million lightning strikes is a superbolt.

That’s pretty special, isn’t it? Absolutely worthy of its own quilt pattern!

Panache-Preview rebecca bryan robert kaufman fabrics
Photo by Rebecca Bryan, Panache fabrics preview

I had a lot of fun sewing with Becca’s fabrics, since she totally nailed my favorite color palette with this fabric line. Teals and magentas, blues and purples, a bit of gold, and of course a solid showing of black and whites. The stripes are a really fun addition, and while I don’t usually gravitate toward stripes, I find myself wanting to work these in anywhere I can!

Superbolt panache quilt detailIt was tough to limit myself to just a few of the colors, but with my design I had to pick my top favorites. Turquoise and magenta won the day, and that perfect purple print with both turquoise and magenta details, called Energy in Berry, was the perfect middle man! Plus, I can’t think of a better fabric name to go in a Superbolt!

superbolt mini quilt top with aurifil threadsI quilted Superbolt with a variety of color-coordinating Aurifil 50wt and 40wt threads. I quilted straight lines in the lighting bolt white sections using 50wt thread in 2600-Dove and the walking foot on my Bernina 560. I’ve been wanting to practice free motion quilting ever since taking Christa Watson’s class at QuiltCon, but haven’t had the right sized project to dive in. I finally bit the bullet with this mini, since using coordinating colors of thread meant I had room to mess up without it being very noticeable. The good news is, I am really happy with how smoothly the quilting ended up, and my confidence is built enough that I think I will be playing with free motion quilting a lot more in the future, even for larger quilts.

quilting detail and striped binding aurifil superbolt panache fabricI used a different design in each colored section, and tried to choose mostly curved designs for the darker areas, with more angular and sharp designs for the light ones. I used 40wt 1148-Light Jade in the teal section (Charisma in Seafoam from Panache), 50wt 2535-Magenta in the purple (Energy in Berry), and 40wt 1100-Red Plum in the bright pink (Spirit in Pink). Because the thread color blends in so well, it’s hard to see how fantastic my free motion quilting was, so you’ll just have to take my word for it! LOL

superbolt mini quilt backingI found the perfect backing fabric for this mini in my stash, Aloe Vera in Candy from Pretty Potent by Anna Maria Horner, and with the addition of a few leftover blocks from the mini quilt top, it came together as a really fun quilt back.

superbolt quilt labelThe striped fabric makes a perfect binding, but also makes a great label! I took the photo before I hand stitched the top edge, and don’t mind that top stray thread that escaped my snips, but I love how easy the stripes made it to write in a straight line! I usually kilter when I write, so having that extra guide was super helpful.

In between the family holiday fun this next month, I will be writing up this Superbolt mini quilt pattern and as soon as it’s ready, it will head out to all of my email newsletter subscribers. Those of you on the list know that my emails are sparse; at most once per week, but more often once per month. Being on my email newsletter list is a way to ensure you’re in the know and the first one to hear about any new patterns, projects, or fun events in the Night Quilter world. You can opt-in HERE. 

I’ll be linking up with Let’s Bee Social, Crazy Mom Quilts Finish it up Friday, and TGIFF. Gotta love a finish!



A Tiny Bit of {Tomte} Stitching

It’s been quiet here lately, but I have been doing a tiny bit of sewing. Literally, only 2″ finished square little! With the hustle and bustle of life, my sewing progress has slowed a bit. I’m still sewing, and trying to create daily, but progress is slowwww. When I saw that Sue from Moss & Lotus was having a Tomte Sew Along on Instagram, I knew I wanted in. I had been admiring the cute little gnome-like Tomtes popping up in my feed, and resisting the urge to add yet another project to my unfinished projects pile. Then Sue asked me if I would make a block or two, and honestly, how could I say no? These guys (and gals) are adorable! Plus, the bigger Tomtes will make wonderful coaster or mug rug gifts. I love having an end use in mind before beginning a new project!

tiny tomte foundation paper pieced pattern moss and lotusBefore stitching up a Peder or Halvor Tomte (my two favs at the moment), I had to sew one of the adorable Tiny Tomtes! This Tiny Tomte is a free addition when you buy the Tomte Bundle and is the size of a mini charm square. I’m going to try to resist the urge to make sweet little Tiny Tomte ornaments for everyone I know, but no promises! This particular little guy will happily live on our tree this year, once I give him a little French knot nose and finish him up with some hand quilting and binding.

tiny tomte moss and lotus foundation paper pieced blockI used a Henry Glass print for the background, since the mushroom and snail seemed right at home with this Tiny Tomte. This print actually also happens to be the very first fabric I ever bought, years and years ago before I began quilting. The red fabric is from my scrap bin, some gorgeous Oakshott Lipari from my Vesuvius quilt. The white is a tiny scrap of Robert Kaufman Kona white. These blocks would actually be really fun uses for any tiny scraps.  I used 50wt Aurifil 2600-Dove thread since that lives in my machine and works for everything.

large shelf fungus tiny tomte foundation paper pieced pattern moss and lotusAfter sewing up this Tiny Tomte, I had to take him out on an adventure in the woods so that he would feel at home. During my youngest’s nap, I ventured out behind our house and Tiny Tomte had a fun photo shoot! We found a gorgeous shelf fungus on a tree stump, so Tiny Tomte played beneath it.

tiny tomte foundation paper pieced moss and lotus pattern

tiny tomte foundation paper pieced moss and lotus patternAnd on top of it!

tiny tomte foundation paper pieced moss and lotus patternHe climbed some trees and gathered some souvenirs.

tiny tomte foundation paper pieced moss and lotus patternA pinecone three times his size and an evergreen bough will have to hold him over until we cut our Christmas tree this year. I think they will do just fine.

What would you make with a Tiny Tomte?


Flit and Bloom Blog Tour: Fussy Cutting Fun

Meticulous cutting is one of my favorite quilting past times, and with all of the new English Paper Piecing (EPP) patterns coming out, there’s ample opportunity for carefully cutting up fabric and piecing it back together in clever ways (widely known as fussy cutting, but read why I prefer “meticulous cutting” here). As soon as I saw Patty Young‘s new Flit and Bloom fabric line for Riley Blake Fabrics, I knew I wanted to create meticulously cut EPP masterpieces with it. From the fanciful hummingbirds and elegant peacocks, to the fact that there are both floral and geometric patterns in the line, there are SO many opportunities for pattern play.

flit and bloom fabric fussy cutting eppToday I’m excited to be the first quilting stop on Patty’s Flit and Bloom Blog Tour, where I get to show you what I’ve been working on these past couple of months using her newest fabric line for Riley Blake Designs. Let’s just say there’s been some meticulous cutting madness in this house lately!

moonstone in flit and bloom eppI began with one of my favorite EPP patterns, Moonstone by Giuseppe (aka @giucy_giuce). I built around the stunning Bloom Henna Blossom in Teal fabric as the center, adding flitting hummingbirds and flowers, some geometric fun to tie the colors together, and coy little pairs of peacocks dancing around the outer edges. I love how this block came together!

peacocks from flit and bloom fabric moonstone eppAren’t these peacocks fun as they dance in pairs around the block?

flowermania epp flit and bloom fabric fussy cuttingWhile I was stitching my Moonstone block, Mathew (aka @misterdomestic)’s new Flowermania quilt EPP pattern arrived on my doorstep. You know I wasn’t going to just let it sit there!! So I dove in, meticulously cutting that same Bloom Henna Blossom in Teal fabric as the petals, showing how versatile this print is with fussy cutting.

flit and bloom fabric fussy cutting flowermania back eppI knew I wanted to incorporate the hummingbirds into this flower block, since hummingbirds and flowers go together like rock and roll, but couldn’t fit them onto any of the individual shapes. Then I realized that I could split the hummingbirds across two background fabrics and decided to go headfirst into meticulous cutting at its best.

flit and bloom fabric fussy cutting flowermania back eppI labeled the humming bird front-back pairs since the Flowermania block is pieced in such a way that they are only joined right at the end as the segments are stitched together. This fussy cutting feat was no easy task, I might add. From the careful cutting to make sure the hummingbird halves would seamlessly meet when stitched together, to basting the pieces *just* so, to then stitching it all together and having it meet perfectly around the green diamonds, this was a challenge. They are not all perfectly matched up, and I learned a few tricks along the way that I’ll keep in mind next time, but overall I’m happy with the outcome.

hummingbird flit and bloom fabric fussy cutting flowermania eppSome hummingbirds match perfectly, but even the imperfect ones are perfect in their own way. Hummingbirds are happily flitting around this Fowermania bloom, and it seems to me that it’s the perfect poster-child block for Flit and Bloom fabrics. Right!?

flit and bloom fabrics lucy boston patchwork of the crosses eppFinally, I started to dive into a Lucy Boston Patchwork of the Crosses block, since what is EPP without Lucy Boston? I love how rotating the fabrics creates even more meticulously cut geometric fun, and I look forward to seeing how this block shapes up.

lucy boston outer pair epp trial runOne of my favorite parts of planning with Lucy Boston blocks is in the outer pairs. I like to make a few “test pairs” with different fabrics and arrangements to see which ones I visually like best.

lucy boston outer pair epp trial runI love that Flit and Bloom has plenty of opportunity for mirror image fussy cutting, since those are my favorites–can you see why?

lucy boston outer pair epp trial runWhich arrangement is your favorite?

aurifil thread 50wt for hand piecing eppI used Aurifil 50wt 2886-Light Avocado thread for all of my piecing, and with the varied colors in these fabrics, its light green color seemed to be the best choice for blending in. Between careful stitching and practicing the flat back stitch, the thread blends right in. I love Aurifil thread for hand stitching!

When I first began piecing these blocks, I was envisioning a sampler EPP pillow, but with the varying sizes of the blocks, I’m thinking I may opt for a table runner instead. That giant Flowermania bloom would make a fantastic centerpiece, wouldn’t it?

flit and bloom fabric fussy cutting eppI hope I’ve inspired you with my meticulous cutting fun with Flit and Bloom fabrics! Fussy cutting opens a whole new world of design, and I encourage you to give it a try!


To help spread the fussy cutting Flit and Bloom love, I have a bundle of Flit and Bloom fabrics left over from my project that I am giving away to one lucky reader.

To enter the giveaway today, let me know what you would make with Flit and Bloom. Leave a comment and make sure I’m able to get ahold of you if you win. For an additional entry, leave another comment telling me how you follow Night Quilter (email listinstagramfacebooktwitter, blog follower, etc.).

This giveaway is open internationally. The giveaway will be open until Saturday, November 11, at 8pm eastern time when I’ll select the winner randomly with random.org. Giveaway is open to participants 18 years or older. This giveaway is now closed. Congratulations to Pamela! 

flit-an-bloom-quilting-tourBe sure to visit the rest of the stops on the Flit and Bloom Blog tour to see what everyone has made with this fun fabric:

Monday, Nov. 6th – Night Quilter <—YOU ARE HERE!
Tuesday, Nov. 7th – Winging It!/Hummingbird Highway
Wednesday, Nov. 8th – Blue Nickel Studios
Thursday, Nov. 9th – ReannaLily Designs
Friday, Nov. 10th – The Sewing Loft
Saturday, Nov. 11th – The Cloth Parcel

 What would you make with Flit and Bloom?

Glade Pillow: A Closer Look

into the forest quilt theory pattern cloud9 organic fabrics aurifilWhile I was piecing my newest Quilt Theory quilt, Into the Forest, I was lamenting the scraps that resulted. With conservation on my mind more than ever lately, I knew I wanted to create a supplemental pattern that would make efficient use of the scraps as the quilt was pieced. I know that for me, using scraps left over from a pattern often falls to the bottom of my to-do list, or the scraps fall into the pile that will slowly and eventually feed tiny scrap projects here and there, but with the little time I have to sew, those projects often fall into the “someday” category, aka an overflowing scrap bin. When all of the necessary piecing is done WHILE you’re sewing together your quilt top, on the other hand, it makes it so much easier to actually put the scraps to good use.

Glade Pillow pattern Into the Forest Quilt Theory bonus patternThus, the Glade Pillow was born. A free bonus pattern for all who purchase Into the Forest, the Glade Pillow uses up a large majority of your scraps, and the pieces are actually sewn while you piece your quilt blocks. That’s a win in my book. I hope you like it, too.

Glade pillow at duskI had a fun photoshoot for this pillow, caught right at dusk with two of my little ones in tow, and thought it would be fun to show you a bit more about the pillow, as well as share peeks at our fun photo shoot. The light is low, and less than optimal, but the photos and memories made are fun ones. It turns out kids have as much fun with a fancy arm chair in the forest as quilters do!

glade pillow backing cloud 9 fabricsFirst, how about some more details about the pillow? Here’s the backing, which I absolutely love! I made an envelop closure but plan to add snaps or buttons in the near future.glade pillow backing cloud 9 fabricsI used scraps from my Into the Forest quilt backing, Birds of a Feather from Bird’s Eye View by Sarah Watson for Cloud 9 Fabrics, as the backing for my Glade Pillow, and used the selvedge as the raw edge of the envelop back closure.

dense quilting with aurifil thread glade pillowI had fun quilting my Glade Pillow with an assortment of Aurifil threads: 40wt: 5005-Medium turquoise, 2785-Very dark navy and 50wt: 2579-Medium orchid, 2800-Mint ice, 2021-Natural white, and of course 2600-Dove. I love the texture that comes with the dense vertical lines and multiple weights of thread, all quilted with my walking foot on my domestic Bernina 560 machine.

You can get the pdf Into the Forest quilt pattern for only $4 in the Quilt Theory shop here, and the Glade Pillow tutorial is linked in the description. You can peek at it here, but just a heads up that some of it won’t make sense without the Into the Forest pattern in front of you.

2 year old pillow photo shoot helperGetting photos of this pillow proved a bit tricky, since an eager 2 year old helper often means photos like this (above). Add a 7 year old sister helper, and they quickly morph to this:

2 year old pillow photo shoot helperSeriously cute!

2 year old pillow photo shoot helper distractionFinn was soon once again distracted by a nearby plant, so Maddie stepped in for her turn.

7 year old pillow photo shoot helperBig girl helper, in so many ways! After the photo shoot, Maddie wanted a turn with my camera. With the strap securely around her neck and extra reminders to be extremely careful, I let her commandeer the camera.

quilty photo shoots with helpAs a result, there’s a bit of proof of what it looks like to have quilty photo shoots with little ones’ help. My middle son was inside intently building with legos and had no interest in helping with our forest romp, but it was really fun to wander into the forest behind our house for a bit. Maddie and Finn had a wonderful time rolling around and being silly in the grass afterward.

kids rolling in the grass

I hope you have fun with the Glade Pillow if you do decide to make Into the Forest! My pile of triangle trimmings from past projects is so large that I knew for this one I just had to use them up immediately or else they were destined to languish with the others. Scrap busting is an art, and not one I have yet mastered!

I’m linking up with Crazy Mom Quilts Finish it up Friday and TGIFF. Finishes feel good and absolutely worth celebrating! (Especially when they are so few and far between!)

Happy sewing!

Quilt Theory Release: Into the Forest

Today I’m excited to share my pattern for Quilt Theory’s collection for fall 2017, Into the Forest. This pattern speaks to my heart, and very much fits the vibe for my summer (it fits right in with my Summer Adventure quilt trees). For our third Quilt Theory collection, we challenged ourselves to create a color palette of 12 colors from which to pull, and all designed our quilts around the same color palette, using fabrics from a variety of manufacturers and designers. In this post you’ll not only get to see my newest pattern, Into the Forest, as well the bonus Glade Pillow pattern than accompanies my Into the Forest Quilt, but you will also have a chance to win a fat quarter bundle of Cloud 9 organic cirrus solids, so read on!

into the forest quilt theory collection 3 aurifil cloud 9 organic fabrics First, to introduce you to my contribution to the third Quilt Theory pattern collection! Inspired by my frequent family hikes, Into the Forest is a reminder of where you should always head–into the forest!

into the forest quilt theory pattern cloud9 organic fabrics aurifil

And into the forest I go, to lose my mind and find my soul. – Unknown

into the forest quilt theory pattern cloud9 organic fabrics aurifilTake a leisurely stroll with me into the depths of nature. Into the Forest plays with two sizes of the same block to create a simple graphic tree design with a crisp and clean aesthetic, like a morning stroll through a cool forest. Inspired by the majestic evergreen trees ubiquitous in Maine, this quilt uses your 5 favorite fat quarters to make a nature inspired lap quilt finishing at 52″ x 60″. Use organic, repurposed, or naturally dyed fabrics to really become one with nature.

into the forest quilt theory pattern cloud9 organic fabrics aurifilIt seemed only natural to choose Cloud 9 organic fabrics for my Into the Forest quilt, since Cloud 9 fabrics uses only 100% certified organic cotton in the manufacturing of their base cloths and eco-responsible low impact dyes for printing and dying. They work closely with mills that are committed to ethical and responsible conduct. This includes respecting the rights of all individuals, a devotion to sustained social compliance, and an accountability to the environment (from the Cloud 9 website). These practices are more important than ever, and Into the Forest seemed a perfect vehicle for this reminder.

into the forest quilt theory pattern cloud9 organic fabrics aurifilMy Into the Forest quilt was partially pieced and quilted by me, and partially pieced and quilted by Sue Bishop. I’m super grateful for Sue’s willingness to step in and make progress on the quilt while I was traveling in the middle of the summer, and her work is impeccable. The quilt was quilted using straight line quilting on both a long arm and my domestic Bernina, and was both pieced and quilted using Aurifil 50wt 2024-White.

Glade Pillow pattern Into the Forest Quilt Theory bonus patternIn the spirit of conservation, I also created a free bonus pillow pattern that uses up most of the scraps created through the construction of Into the Forest. The link to the bonus pillow pattern is included on the pdf purchase page here, but note that you need both the pillow pattern and the original quilt pattern to create the pillow. I had a lot of fun quilting the Glade Pillow and used an assortment of Aurifil threads: 40wt: 5005-Medium turquoise, 2785-Very dark navy and 50wt: 2579-Medium orchid, 2800-Mint ice, 2021-Natural white, and of course 2600-Dove. I’ll be sharing a closer look at the Glade Pillow soon, so stay tuned!

into the forest quilt urban cashmereMichelle, our fearless Quilt Theory leader and company photographer got some gorgeous shots of our quilts at Urban Cashmere, too. I love these shots!
into the forest quilt urban cashmereAll of the Quilt Theory patterns are simple enough to be printed on 4″x6″ cards or a single page downloadable pdf. At only $4 each, they are perfect for gift giving or collecting, too!

How to buy or stock Quilt Theory Patterns

You can buy either individual or a pattern collector’s package of PDF patterns through our Quilt Theory website right now!

quilt theory collection 3Collection 3 pattern cards will be coming soon to a local quilt shop near you, and the first two collections are still available, so go ahead and ask for all of them! If you are a quilt shop and want to carry our patterns, set up a wholesale account here, or order through Checker Distributors, EE Schenck Company, or Erie Quilt Art for Canadian shops.

Want to buy the cards, but don’t own a quilt shop? Let your local quilt shop know you want them to carry Quilt Theory patterns (click for a handy note to send to your favorite local quilt shop!)

Now, for the Giveaway!

Kitty Cloud9 Giveaway cirrus solids organicCloud 9 fabrics was generous enough to offer a fat quarter (FQ) bundle of 12 of their luscious organic cirrus solids to one of my lucky readers!

organic cotton | happy you | happy earth

Take a look at these luscious colors! Many thanks to Cloud 9 for sponsoring this giveaway, and to Yvonne from Quilting Jetgirl, who photographed these beauties for me!

To enter the giveaway today, tell me your favorite conservation tip–how do you aim to help the earth daily? (If you need ideas, check this list and begin today). Leave a comment and make sure I’m able to get ahold of you if you win. For an additional entry, leave another comment telling me how you follow Night Quilter (email listinstagramfacebooktwitter, blog follower, etc.) Follow Quilt Theory (facebooktwitterInstagram, etc.) and tell me how in a third comment for a third entry. 

This giveaway is open to US participants. The giveaway will be open until Monday October 23rd, at 8pm eastern time when I’ll select the winner randomly with random.org. Giveaway is open to participants 18 years or older. The giveaway is now closed! Congratulations to Abby!

Quilt Theory Release Blog Hop Schedule

Thanks so much for letting me share my quilt with you! Be sure to check out everyone on the Quilt Theory blog hop. Each day, one designer will share more about her quilt and reveal never before seen photos. And each designer will be giving away an amazing prize so be sure to follow along!

Just to wrap up I’ll share a few fun outtakes from my Into the Forest photo shoot, taken with my family at Birch Point State Park in Owl’s Head, Maine before mailing the quilt off to Michelle to work her photography magic.

quilt photography with kidsquilt photography with kidsquilt photography with kidsquilt photography with kidsHe finally realized that I was on the other side taking photos! No photo shoot is complete without a kid cameo, though, right?

I also love seeing how different the forests on the west coast look compared to the forests on the east coast. Michelle took some absolutely magical photos of Into the Forest, too.

Wandering into a west coast forest…

into the forest maineWandering into an east coast forest…

No matter where your forest may be, take Into the Forest with you!

I’ll be linking up with Let’s Bee SocialTGIFF, and Crazy Mom Quilts Finish it up Friday!

Embroidery & Modern Quilting Feature

A while back I was contacted about the mini quilt I made for Andover Fabrics‘ booth at QuiltCon 2017, for which I used my Constant Flux pattern paired with Wild Boho-style applique and embroidery to make an Alison Glass fabric bonanza I entitled “The Bee’s Knees in Constant Flux”.  A bunch of interview questions and many months later, I’m excited to have gotten a copy of the fall Modern Patchwork magazine, and I’m honored to be featured among such talent!

Modern Patchwork magazine nightquilter feature embroideryThe article, written by Meg Cox, discusses the appeal of embroidery and hand stitching to modern quilters, and features many of my favorite makers–Alison Glass, Rebecca Ringquist, Nichole Vogelsinger, and Hannah Claire Somerville, all of whom have inspired me along my path to embroidery and its involvement in modern quilting.

modern patchwork magazine fall 2017I ordered my copy of the magazine through the Quilting Daily website, but I also have seen copies at my local big box bookstore (Books-a-Million) and Joann Fabric stores.

Do you subscribe to this magazine? I’d love to hear what you thought about the interview, and about embroidery’s role in modern quilting! I’m excited to incorporate embroidery and hand quilting into more of my future makes. Now I just need to figure out how to jump back on the “finish the project” bandwagon! ha!

Happy Monday!

Moonstone Madness (in the Best Way)

I was bitten by the EPP bug years ago, but this summer I came down with a serious case of Moonstone Madness, and in the best possible way! In June, my talented friend Giuseppe Ribaudo aka @giucy_giuce released his first English Paper Pieced pattern in partnership with Karen of @karenthediyaddict, called Moonstone. He was kind enough to send me a kit and boy has it kept me busy and grinning pretty much all summer! I love EPP and hand stitching is the perfect solution for busily adventuring makers in the summer months, and this pattern didn’t disappoint.

moonstone quilt progress giucy giuce pattern alison glass fabricIn the spirit of setting myself up for success, I opted to make four (4) blocks to make a pillow rather than a full sized quilt, and I dove into my bright Alison Glass stash to put together a fully saturated, smooth rainbow gradient. You know how I feel about rainbows. Alison Glass fabric rainbow + Giucy Giuce EPP project = heaven on a summer’s day!

alison glass rainbow moonstone giucy giuce epp pattern aurifil threadI used mostly 50wt Aurifil thread, with a few 80wts thrown in, using coordinating colors so that the stitches blend right in with the blocks. The threads shown here are (from top left clockwise): 2535-Magenta, 1154-Dusty Orange, 5015-Gold Yellow, 5017-Shining Green, and 1125-Medium Teal, all 50wt. There’s nothing quite as satisfying as matching the perfect thread to your fabric!

alison glass ex libris art theory panel rainbow epp moonstone quiltAlison’s Art Theory print from her Ex Libris line (still my ultimate favorite fabric ever) was my color inspiration, so I planned my 4-block panel around the color flow in the center octagon. Throughout the course of the summer, I finished the four blocks and completely stitched them together!

alison glass rainbow moonstone quilt giucy giuce epp patternNow I am at the point in the game where this could lounge in the works in progress pile for a while, but instead, I am going to use my excitement to forge ahead and aim to finish this beauty, which is sure to be my most favorite pillow of all time.

choosing a background fabric alison glassMy next step is to choose background fabric, press the pieced panel thoroughly, remove the template papers (so that I can use them again!!), and then hand stitch the panel down onto the background fabric. Just last week, I visited my local quilt shop Fiddlehead Artisan Supply in Belfast, ME, in the hopes of buying some yardage of Insignia in charcoal by Alison Glass, which is a nearly-solid. While Fiddlehead did not have the Insignia, they did have two other options that I bought to try out: Flying Geese in Dark Charcoal from Handcrafted, and Ink in Charcoal from Sun Print 2016 (all for Andover Fabrics).

alison glass rainbow moonstone giucy giuce epp patternAfter looking at those options, I still felt like I needed to see the Insignia before deciding, and with the encouragement of a few friends on Instagram, especially Erin who said, “I’m a strong believer in first instinct=best instinct!”, I ordered a yard of Insignia in Charcoal from Alison Glass’s shop. (Thank you Erin!). Clearly, my first gut choice is the winning choice!

alison glass rainbow moonstone quilt giucy giuce pattern aurifil monofilament threadNext I will hand stitch this epic panel to the perfect Insignia background using Aurifil’s monofilament thread in Smoke. I plan to quilt this with the Smoke monofilament thread, too, and I’m so excited just thinking about how amazing this pillow will be. This will be my first time sewing with monofilament thread, either by hand or machine, so I’ll be sure to share how it goes.

If you’d like to get a Moonstone kit for yourself, you can order one HERE on Karen the DIY Addict’s site. The kit is pretty amazing, with acrylic templates for every piece, as well as enough pre-cut foundation papers to make a full 72″x72″ quilt (or lots of pillows!), a booklet with Giuseppe’s reflections, thoughts, tips, and four (4) different layout suggestions, and of course coloring pages for all four layouts.

moonstone quilt ocean theme tula pink giucy giuce pattern aurifilAs for me, I’m nearly finished piecing my next rendition of a Moonstone block, going with the Gems layout and a more nautical theme. I plan to make only one block and top stitch it to a large zippered pouch for a friend to whom I owe a quilt. I’m hoping the consolation diaper pouch/zipped pouch will hold her (and her nearly 1 year old baby) over until I manage to make the quilt!

moonstone madness giucy giuce epp kit patternAs you can see, I’ve been absolutely struck with Moonstone Madness and it doesn’t appear to be tapering off just yet. I’ve had a wonderful time piecing together these blocks, and the portable nature of English Paper Piecing ensures that it is still very much on the top of my “summer stitching” projects list!

What did you stitch this summer? 

I’m linking up with Let’s Bee Social, since it’s about time I was social in blogland again!