Tag Archives: fiddlehead artisan supply

AG Challenge Finish: Noodlehead Diaper Pouch

Sometimes you just need a quick finish. Something small and beautiful that you made with your own hands, but that takes only hours (instead of days) to create. When Yvonne announced her Quilting Jetgirl Alison Glass Challenge as an incentive for the rest of us to get one of our Alison Glass fabric makes into the finished pile, I had a few different ideas of which of my many Alison Glass-influenced projects I should finish first. At first I thought I’d focus on the table runner I started late last year using the Insignia and Seventy-Six fabric lines, but then thought it might be the perfect boost to finally finish Max’s Eye Spy quilt that has a dominance of bright Alison Glass prints from across the years. Then I gave myself a reality check and decided to select something small. I have two big deadline projects to finish within the next month, so to be real I decided to pull a diaper pouch project off of my WIPs shelves and finish it up. I’m so glad I did!!

noodlehead diaper pouch alison glass art theory panelI made this Diaper Pouch using a free tutorial by Anna Graham of Noodlehead, found here. It took me about two (2) hours to make, start to finish, which is pretty awesome as far as projects go.

noodlehead diaper pouch alison glass art theory panelI used my all time favorite Alison Glass Print, the Art Theory Panel from her Ex Libris line as the outer panel, and lined it with Artifact in Charcoal from her Abacus line (Andover Fabrics). I was lucky enough to buy all of these fabrics, AND the cotton webbing strap from my local quilt shop Fiddlehead Artisan Supply.

I used my go-to 50wt Aurifil thread 2600-Dove for all the piecing and 50wt 2692-Black for sewing on the velcro so that the stitches would not stand out. I love that Fiddlehead also carries a good selection of Aurifil threads! One stop shopping for the win!

noodlehead diaper pouch alison glass art theory panelOf course I had to plan it so that the rainbow star from Artifact was visible right on the top. I should have given myself a tiny bit more space in that seam, but I’m not losing sleep over it. It’s gorgeous anyway!

noodlehead diaper pouch alison glass art theory panelNow instead of having a purse filled with diapers and wipes floating every which way, I can have a beautiful and function space to store them compactly, not only making the inside of my purse a bit more organized, but also making it easy for me to visually check that I have a diaper for my little one before I head out!

noodlehead diaper pouch alison glass art theory panelSince pens are another item I’m often digging for in the chaos within my gorgeous bag, I decided to store two of my favorite micron pens tucked in the corner of the diaper pouch, so that they are easily found when I think of something to add to my Quilter’s Planner Mini–my traveling to-do list, grocery list, and inspiration keeper. Pst… you can now order the Quilter’s Planner Minis individually, here. Just a PSA for the day!

noodlehead diaper pouch alison glass art theory panelThis pouch also perfectly coordinates with the amazing Alison Glass fabric bag my husband bought me for my birthday last year, made by the ever talented Kristy at Rock Baby Scissors. There’s no such thing as too much Alison Glass fabric, right?! No way!! What next?…. I’m thinking a few zip pouches to help organize the other contents of my purse. What’s your favorite simple zip pouch pattern? (Noodlehead’s Open-Wide Zippered Pouch is a fab one, but should I know about others?)

I’m linking up with Amanda Jean at Crazy Mom Quilts Finish it up Friday, and of course Yvonne’s Alison Glass Challenge. Yippee for gorgeous and functional finishes!

Stash Building: Low Volume Loves & 3K IG Giveaway

I recently hit a pretty big milestone over on Instagram when I surpassed 3K followers, so to help celebrate that (and the fact that it was my birthday yesterday), I’m hosting a pretty epic giveaway over on Instagram. If you haven’t seen it yet, check out my feed @nightquilter and enter to win! The giveaway will close tomorrow (Monday) night at 9pm EST.

Giveaway nightquilter 3K IGI figured I couldn’t go wrong giving away some of my all-time favorite fabrics and threads, and I’m so very grateful to my sponsors for donating the prizes. The prize package contains (from left to right): a fat quarter bundle of Endpaper from Sun Prints 2016 by Alison Glass (Andover) donated by Fiddlehead Artisan Supply; a low volume bundle of 14 gorgeous quilting cottons curated my yours truly donated by Fat Quarter Shop, and the Simply Color by Vanessa Christensen large spool set of 50wt Aurifil thread donated by Alex Veronelli at Aurifil. Many, many thanks!!

fat quarter shop low volume bundleFat Quarter Shop also sent a low volume bundle for me to keep since I curated it, so I’m super excited to be restocking my low volumes! The low volume bundle is available here. Go check it out, and if you love low volumes as much as I do, I hereby give you permission to treat yourself!

low volume bundle fat quarter shop nightquilterI included a little bit of everything in this bundle, including Cotton + Steel basics, Modern Background Paper, Lizzy House mini pearl bracelets, prints from Anna Maria Horner’s newest line, a print from Wonderland by Katarina Rocella, those adorable scissors from Maker Make by Art Gallery fabrics, and more. You’ll have to visit the post on Fat Quarter Shop to see the full list of included fabrics, but I can tell you I’m loving every one and already plotting the next low volume + rainbow Alison Glass fabrics project (are you surprised?).

As always, I’ll be sure to show you once I start putting these fabrics to use. In the meantime, head over to Instagram to enter for a chance to win your very own stash building prize package! I apologize to those of you who don’t have Instagram, but there’s sure to be another great giveaway here on the blog, too. Surpassing 3 thousand followers needs some celebrating!

I’m linking up with Molli’s Sunday Stash, since my low volume stash grew in a fabulous way this week, and one lucky follower will be REALLY building his/her stash soon! Best of luck!

Stash Building: Art Theory Panels in a Panic

My recent scour of the internet in search of Carolyn Friedlander’s old Architextures fabrics for THIS project has given me a new appreciation for stashing your favorites before they disappear. Once a fabric line is out of print, especially if it’s been out of print for a while, those fabrics are GONE. Legit, no stores have them, not even Etsy, gone.

art theory panels ex libris alison glassThis realization gave me a little bit of a panic, so I quickly contacted my local quilt shop Fiddlehead Artisan Supply and had them set aside three yards of the Alison Glass Art Theory panels from Ex Libris (Andover Fabrics) in charcoal and one yard in white. Better safe than sorry, right? If I could afford to buy a bolt of each and every Sun Print fabric, too, I totally would. But the line has to be drawn somewhere!!

art theory panels ex libris alison glassIt’s no secret that I love Alison Glass fabrics, and these panels are just SO gorgeous. I have a few projects in mind already for these, and I don’t think I will ever tire of the colors and design. Having a bit of “extra” in the stash never hurt anyone.

art theory panels ex libris alison glassMaybe I’ll even get brave and cut into a few to use bits and pieces in a project beyond the full intact round panel. Maybe.

art theory panels ex libris alison glassIf you want to stock up before it’s too late, Fiddlehead does still have some yardage of these panels available, I think. They are not listed online, but if you call the store you can order some. No, I’m not *trying* to be an enabler. No, I don’t work for Alison Glass (to answer your question, Nancy! lol But wouldn’t that be a dream!?), but I really do honest-to-goodness love the vivid designs in her fabric. I’m trying to help. Really. Or if you are on a fabric diet, go ahead and let me know your birthday and I’ll set a panel aside for you.

art theory panels ex libris alison glassI mean, look at those details!

I’m linking up with Molli Sparkles’ Sunday Stash traveling edition, which is hosted by Irene from Patchwork and Pastry today.

 

 

Autumn Dusk Kaleidoscope Pillow Tutorial

Today I’m going to share a quick tutorial on how to make your very own Kaleidoscope pillow using the Sizzix BigZ L Kaleidoscope die and six fat quarters (I used my Autumn Dusk blogger bundle from Fiddlehead Artisan Supply). For those of you who do not have a Sizzix die cutting machine, I will also include a printable foundation paper piecing option, so read on!

kaleidoscope pillow tutorialA month or so ago, I selected a blogger bundle for my local quilt shop Fiddlehead Artisan Supply, and called it Autumn Dusk. The colors made me think of the calm at dusk, and I thought it would be a perfect palette for a pillow. Our couch doesn’t have a single handmade pillow, and that needed to change. In thinking about pattern ideas, I came across my Kaleidoscope die from Sizzix and decided to play. Do you have ANY idea how many different patterns you can make with the Kaleidoscope pattern!? It boggles my mind. Peek at the results from a quick “kaleidoscope quilt” google search HERE to give you an idea of the potential.

fiddlehead artisan supply autumn dusk kaleidoscope pillow sizzix tutorialTrust me when I say the most difficult part is deciding on fabrics and fabric placement.

autumn dusk kaleidoscope pillow tutorial sizzixThis tutorial will include cutting instructions for the same arrangement of nine (9) blocks made from six (6) fat quarters of fabric as I used, as well as assembly and finishing instructions for an envelope-backed 18″ square pillow. If you want to make an identical pillow, you can buy the Autumn Dusk bundle from Fiddlehead HERE, or enter to win a bundle by commenting on yesterday’s post HERE. I have included some affiliate links in this post so that if you click through, I will get a small commission. I only share products I love and use.

Let’s get started!

TUTORIAL- Kaleidoscope PillowMaterials Needed:

If you are creating your own kaleidoscope version, print out this printable provided by Debby at Quilter by Design and start playing with color combinations. Note that you can emphasize a windmill shape, a star shape, or a circular movement depending on where you position your colors and values of fabric. Once your design and fabric choices have been made, it’s time to cut!

Kaleidoscope fabric numbersFor this pillow, cut the following (refer to the photo above for fabric numbers):

Fabric 1: 36 wedges and 12 corners
Fabric 2: 8 wedges and 16 corners
Fabric 3: 8 wedges
Fabric 4: 8 wedges and 8 corners
Fabric 5: 4 wedges
Fabric 6: 8 wedges

sizzix kaleidoscope pillow tutorialFor quick and easy cutting with your Sizzix fabi, cut fabric strips 4″ wide for the wedges and 2 5/8″ wide for the corners.

sizzix kaleidoscope tutorialThen you can accordion-fold the fabric over the die and cut 16 of each at a time, since the die has 2 corner and 2 wedge blades and you can layer fabric 8 layers thick. That’s 32 pieces cut per pass, if you plan your fabric cutting wisely! (Note that the image above is to demonstrate the accordion-fold, not the uber efficient cutting!)

autumn dusk kaleidoscope pillow tutorial sizzixOnce your pieces are all cut, lay them out in your desired pattern. Tip: Take a photo with your phone or camera once you’ve decided on a layout. Having this photo handy during piecing will make getting everything in the proper place the first time so much easier!

sizzix kaleidoscope tutorialNow let’s sew the blocks together!

sizzix kaleidoscope tutorialFirst, sew the corners onto the appropriate wedge blocks.

Kaleidoscope Lining up notches from sizzixThe notches cut by the Sizzix make accurate piecing easy. Center the corner piece right sides together with the bottom edge of the wedge piece as shown in the inset photo above. Then use the little corners sticking out from the bottom edges of the wedge as a sewing guide. Set seams and press open.

sizzix kaleidoscope tutorialYou will then have this.

sizzix kaleidoscope tutorialNext, pair each cornered wedge with a background wedge. Be sure to sew along the same side edge for each pair, and begin sewing from the corner edge and not the center point. Set seams, press open. **Note that assembling this block is a perfect time to practice pressing and NOT ironing. Even a little wiggle might stretch sections enough to result in a ripple when the final block is assembled. Press: up, down, up. NOT ironing. Got it!**

sizzix kaleidoscope tutorialDouble check your arrangement with the photo you took before sewing pairs together.

sizzix kaleidoscope tutorialYou will now have two halves. Aligning the notched corners and pinning just after the center seam match, sew the halves together. Set seams and press open.

sizzix kaleidoscope tutorialTa-da! You have a kaleidoscope block. Make 9 total.

kaleidoscope block chain piecingFeel free to chain piece these blocks, but have your layout photo handy. Lay out your pieces and confirm arrangement before sewing each step.

joining rows of kaleidoscope blocks tutorialArrange your blocks as desired. Double check that all fabrics are in the proper place.

joining rows of kaleidoscope blocks tutorialThen sew the blocks in each row together. Finally, sew the three rows together to complete the pillow top.

joining rows of kaleidoscope blocks tutorialI love how the notches cut by the Sizzix help with every step of the piecing process–from piecing to matching points in the final assembly. When joining your rows, you can use the seam line as a guide to make sure you don’t lose any points.

kaleidoscope tutorialOnce your kaleidoscope pillow top is complete, baste it to a 20″x20″ piece of batting (or fuse to fusible fleece), find some coordinating thread and quilt as desired. I used Aurifil 50wt 2560-Iris since it was a nice gentle purple and matched my light colors while providing great contrast with the dark background.

Once your pillow top is quilted, square it up with a rotary cutter, being sure to leave a 1/4″ seam allowance from the outermost points.

pillow envelope backing tutorialNext, we’ll make the pillow’s back panels. Cut two (2) pieces of 13 1/2″x19″ background fabric (my finished pillow top actually measured closer to 19″ than 18 1/2″ square. Adjust accordingly based on the measurement of your pillow) and two (2) pieces of 12 3/4″x19″ batting.

pillow envelope backing tutorialLayer the backing panels wrong sides facing the batting, and lining up three edges. The backing fabric should extend about 3/4″ on one side.

pillow envelope backing tutorialFold the extended edge in 1/4″. Press with a hot iron.

pillow envelope backing tutorialFold over again, flush with the edge of the batting (approx 1/2″) and press. Pin or clip in place.

pillow envelope backing tutorialPin along the edges of the backing fabric and batting to help keep them together if you want to, although I found that they stuck together just fine without any pins. Alternately, you could fuse on fusible fleece instead of batting, although this is a great project for using up batting scraps. With the backing fabric right side facing up, top stitch 1/4″ from the folded edge. Sew again 1/8″ from the first stitches. Repeat for the other panel.

pillow envelope backing tutorialNow it’s time to sew the pillow front to the back panels.  Lay the quilted pillow top right side facing up, and place the back panels right sides facing down, with the raw edges aligning with the raw edges of the pillow top and the sewn hem edges toward the center of the pillow.

pillow envelope backing tutorialThere should be about 6″ of overlap.

Pin securely and sew around the entire edge of the pillow. Be sure to reinforce where the envelope edges meet, sewing back and forth multiple times, since they will receive the bulk of the wear and tear as the pillow form is put in and taken out.

Clip the corners, and turn right side out through the envelope opening, carefully pushing out corners with a blunt chopstick. Insert an 18″ pillow form, or one of your old couch cushions, and enjoy!

kaleidoscope pillow tutorialtula pink poniesMax quickly discovered that there were ponies on the pillow, so he had to run and get his best friend, aptly named Pony.

pony and kaleidoscope pillowpony and kaleidoscope pillowThis pillow apparently now belongs to Pony, since, well… ponies!

 

 

Stash Building: Autumn Dusk Blogger Bundle & Giveaway

I’ve been trying to stretch out of my comfort zone lately and create with color palettes other than rainbow order. With that goal in mind, I put together another blogger bundle for Fiddlehead Artisan Supply in Belfast, Maine, including some of my favorite autumnal colors. To play with the Summer Nights bundle I curated in August, this one is called Autumn Dusk. To double the fun, I have a bundle to give away, too!

autumn dusk fabric bundle fiddlehead artisan supplyThis color palette feels peaceful to me, with the soft purples, burgundy, magenta, mauvey peach, and a pop of turquoise. I’ve been working on a project using my bundle and I admit, it feels weird to be working with a non-rainbow color palette with no low volumes or black/charcoal neutrals…. but I like it!

Tomorrow I’ll be sharing a tutorial for the project I’m making with this bundle, so if you want to add these fabrics to your stash and immediately put them to use (fabric added to the stash doesn’t count if it’s immediately created into something beautiful, right?), you can with ease.

autumn dusk fabric bundle fiddlehead artisan supplyThese fabrics are all great stash additions, and help bolster my weak purple collection a bit. They are consistent with my love of tone on tones and blenders, which means my scraps will surely make their way into a rainbow somehow.

Autumn Dusk fabric bundle fiddlehead artisan supplyFiddlehead Artisan Supply is generously offering an Autumn Dusk fat quarter bundle to one of my readers. The bundle includes fat quarters of the following six fabrics (clockwise from Tula’s ponies):

  • Pony Play from Fox Field by Tula Pink (Free Spirit)
  • Leaves in Turquoise from In the Bloom by Valori Wells (Robert Kaufman)
  • Full Circle in Petal Pink from Shape of Spring by Eloise Renouf (Cloud 9)
  • Bike Paths in Lilac by Alison Glass (Andover)
  • Twinkle Twinkle in Burgundy from Natural History by Lizzy House (Andover)
  • Jewels in Purple from Hello Pilgrim by Lizzy House (Andover)

To enter the giveaway today, visit Fiddlehead’s online shop and tell me your favorite quilting print from their online offerings (click here for a direct link). Leave a comment and make sure I’m able to get ahold of you if you win.  If you’re a follower of Night Quilter, leave a second comment telling me how you follow for a second entry. ‘Like’ Fiddlehead Artisan Supply on Facebook or subscribe to their newsletter and tell me how you followed them in a third comment for a third entry. That’s three separate comments for three entries to win.

This giveaway is open to US and international participants.  The giveaway will be open until 8pm Sunday 12/6 when I’ll select the winner randomly with random.org. Good luck!  This giveaway has ended. Congratulations to Linda!

Fiddlehead is also having a big online sale through tomorrow (Monday 11/30) so you can get 15% off your entire online order with the code Thanks2015. That’s as good a reason as any to bolster your stash, don’t you think? *wink*

I’m linking up with Molli’s Sunday Stash. I’ve been quiet in the stash building department lately, but I have a few fun new stash additions I’ll be sharing in the coming weeks! I’m gathering fabric to last me through the snowy season; after all, winter is coming.

Stash Building: Fussy Cutting Fabrics & Summer Nights Winner

Today I’m not only sharing some additions to my stash, I’m also announcing the winner of the Summer Nights bundle giveaway sponsored by Fiddlehead Artisan Supply. Let’s celebrate the winner first!

summer nights fabric bundle fiddlehead
Summer Nights bundle at Fiddlehead Artisan Supply.

Once again, your comments were my absolute favorite part about the giveaway. To enter the giveaway, I asked you to share what you think of when you hear “summer nights”. Many of you immediately thought of the song from Grease, which honestly had not even entered my mind. Here is just a tiny sampling of some of the other gorgeous images you shared. Honestly, you’re poets!:

  • starry skies and campfires, s’mores and songs – Jenn
  • a glass of wine in the garden in the evening looking at the moon, with my husband sitting beside me – Helen
  • A cold drink and good conversation on the patio with friends. Staying up late, talking late into the night. – Amanda
  • Star gazing and fireflies – Monique B.
  • I remember back when we used to arrive at the beach after dark and you could hear and smell the ocean, but not see the waves washing up on the shore. It held the promise of warm days on the sand and wading in the water to cool off. Happy times. – Amelia V,
  • Summer nights… trees, black silhouettes against deepening dark blues of the sky… Soft breezes bringing a cool freshening, chasing the day’s heat… A cacophony of frogs, joined by the insistent chirping of crickets… Mystical, magical periodic blinking of fireflies (“lightening bugs”)… The scent of summer blossoms and growing, ripening gardens all around, lulling and delighting with every breath taken… “Day’s end, and all is right”, now, in this moment of time… – Pat T.

and finally, my favorite, which really should be published somewhere awesome:

Summer nights of my long ago childhood includes the wonderful memories of visiting my cousins in rural South Eastern Oklahoma. We would be playing as dusk started settling in. Dinner would have been enjoyed by the crowd of extended family. Always enough, always super tasty, never fancy. Then the adults would settle into their metal lawn chairs as we children raced around the yard. I can remember the low buzzing of their conversation as we played. They were talking about times before us and so we went about creating our own memories, not really sharing theirs. The light would fade and fade until it was almost completely dark around us, the porch light left on, but it’s beam barely reaching into the darkness. Beyond its beam, hidden in the dusk the adults would still carry on with their reminiscing, the murmuring and occasional sound of laughter a constant backdrop to our continued play. And this is when the magic happened. The magic of fireflies. First just a few, then finally a full chorus of them in the dark. Somehow jars would magically appear in our hands. The game was on! Cousins and I dashed as we tried to catch the elusive insects, nothing like the brash ugly insects bashing themselves around the back light porch! These were silent and graceful, taking all your skill to try to catch one as its light flickered on and off and on and off, teasing us to catch it.
So, that’s what I think of when summer nights are mentioned. I hope there are children still out there chasing fireflies and letting them go, barely hearing the history of their people as it’s murmured from lawn chairs that still sit under the clump of trees. It has been years and years since I have seen a firefly. Are they still out there? – magistra13

You probably want to know who won, though, right? Mr. Random chose number 74, which was Linda.

Summer nights winner

Congratulations, Linda! Your bundle will be mailed out tomorrow. Enjoy stitching with watermelon juice running down your chin! For those of you who didn’t win this one, you can buy this bundle from Fiddlehead Artisan Supply’s online shop (or in person) until they sell out!

It’s a big stash building day, since not only am I bolstering Linda’s stash, but I am also sharing a few new fabric bits that I bought at Maine Quilts for my own English Paper Piecing (EPP) stash. I love tone on tones, but meticulous cutting (also known as fussy cutting) is best with busier prints with lots going on.

stash building fussy cutting bundleHere is my full haul, from windswept kids to flowers (what!? I bought floral prints!?) to awesome sloths.

Meticulous cutting fussy cutting fabric pullThese first three fabrics were purchased from Alewives Fabrics, and are intended to work together in a currently unplanned future EPP project. From top to bottom, I bought:

  • 1/2 yard of Zephyr by Rashida Coleman Hale for Cotton & Steel
  • 1/4 yard of Picnic by Melody Miller for Cotton & Steel
  • 1 yard of Moon Shine by Tula Pink for Free Spirit Fabrics

I typically don’t buy (or like, for that matter) floral prints, but that Moon Shine just drew me in and made me say uncle. I think the bold black background with the bright red, lime green, and turquoise combo just begs to be cut up and sewn back together in a fun geometric EPP way. I decided to add in a bit of the red Picnic and a generous splash of the limey green Zephyr, and there we have a solid beginning to a new project.

Flora Bazzar in Orchid by Joel Dewberry for FreeSpirit FabricsI also bought 1/2 yard of this Floral Bazzar in Orchid by Joel Dewberry for Free Spirit Fabrics. Again, it’s far more floral than I typically buy, but the diverse and detailed print just begs to be meticulously cut and pieced back together. I loved the color combination of the bright navy blue, coral, magenta, and grey and so bought this as a feature fabric for yet another not-yet-planned future EPP project. Just look at all of the variation in this one print!

Flora Bazzar in Orchid by Joel Dewberry for FreeSpirit Fabrics

Flora Bazzar in Orchid by Joel Dewberry for FreeSpirit FabricsSame fabric, different perspective, and an entirely new look, which means this will be FUN to chop!

Sloths from Honeymoon by Sarah Watts for Cotton & SteelFinally, these sloths!! Seriously, how could I NOT buy some of this fabric?! This is the epic sloth fabric, Sketches & Memories from Costa Rica from Honeymoon by Sarah Watts for Cotton & Steel. I bought 1/2 yard of this fabric from Fiddlehead Artisan Supply‘s booth at Maine Quilts. I don’t know what I’m going to make with it yet, but I just couldn’t resist. I surely will need to buy more, and might make a sloth bag just so that I can tote these guys around everywhere.

Did you know that I have a degree in Environmental science and saw sloths in Costa Rica while there for a Tropical Biology class? It wasn’t my honeymoon–maybe we should have gone to Costa Rica–but it sure is a memory, and I’m pretty sure I have a sketch (or at least a photograph) somewhere!

Does fabric ever talk to you, grab your wrist, and refuse to let you go without buying some? And then snuggle you the whole way home? Okay, good. I’m not weird.

I’m linking up with Molli Sparkles’ Sunday Stash, where he shows us the finer points of the not-so-floral Liberty prints.

Feather on a Summer’s Night {& a Giveaway}

I’ve wanted to make the feathers from Shape Moth’s Forest Quilt Along since I first began paper piecing. After recently selecting a fabric bundle for Fiddlehead Artisan Supply, I was trying to decide what project to make with the bundle. I asked my friend Stephanie and she immediately replied, “Feathers!”. Done deal.

summer nights fabric bundle fiddleheadIt’s no secret that I love high contrast and bright colors. Dark midnight blues paired with bright oranges and yellow compose this month’s blogger bundle for Fiddlehead Artisan Supply. It’s called “Summer Nights“, reminiscent of fireflies and popsicles. Scroll down to enter for a chance to win a Summer Nights bundle for yourself.

summer nights fabric bundle fiddleheadThere’s just something about this bundle that was begging to be stitched into feathers, or maybe fireflies. I might have to work on a firefly pattern, now that we mention it. Inspiration is everywhere!

shape moth featherI love how bright and bold the yellow and orange look against the dark blue. The fact that the fabrics include some of my favorites (Doe, Prisma Elements, Plume, and a fun new find by Lecien) surely adds to the appeal.

foundation paper pieced back detailI used wash-away stabilizer sheets provided to me by Alyssa at Pile O’Fabric, and I’m both excited and nervous to soak this block in water so that the sheets dissolve. Imagine that–foundation paper piecing without having to remove the paper at the end! I’ll be sure to write a post about how it all goes once I build up the bravery to let the feather take the plunge.

Growth of a Feather
The growth of a feather, via Instagram #sewtake20 posts.

I’m not quite sure what I will create out of this bright feather block; I think for sure I will make its little buddy (the second feather in the pattern) before fully finishing. I’m on the fence about whether to make it into a pillow or a mini wall hanging. I’m leaning toward a pillow, with the Plume fabric as the back. What would you make?

summer nights fabric bundle fiddleheadFiddlehead Artisan Supply is generously offering a Summer Nights fat quarter bundle to one of my readers. The bundle includes fat quarters of the following six fabrics (clockwise from the feathers):

  • Plume in Onyx from Nomad by Urban Chiks for Moda
  • Lecien Chatter Tailors #40507
  • Doe Trellis in Blue by Carolyn Friedlander for Robert Kaufman Fabrics
  • Prisma Elements in Solar Quartz for Art Gallery Fabrics
  • Moda Half Moon Modern Scissors in Orange
  • Prisma Elements in Apricot Sunstone for Art Gallery Fabrics

To enter the giveaway today, share what you think of when you hear “summer nights”. Feel free to share word associations or stories; just fill the comments with summer night favorites! Leave a comment and make sure I’m able to get ahold of you if you win.  If you’re a follower of Night Quilter, leave a second comment telling me how you follow for a second entry. Like Fiddlehead Artisan Supply on Facebook or subscribe to their newsletter and tell me how you followed them for a third entry.

This giveaway is open to US and international participants.  The giveaway will be open until 8pm Wednesday 8/5 when I’ll select the winner randomly with random.org. Good luck!Note: This giveaway is now closed! 

I also completed my July Goal for A Lovely Year of Finishes, but I can’t show you yet! The goal was to complete the quilt and pattern that will be published in the September issue of Make Modern Magazine. Rather than post a boring, photoless post to document that I’ve met my goal, I’ll use this post as a multi-finish! I’m linking up with Crazy Mom Quilts Finish it up Friday, and ALYoF as my July Finish post.

Dropping in on A Quilter’s Color Weekend

Last weekend I had the pleasure of taking an entire day for quilty crafty inspiration. I didn’t even touch a sewing machine, yet I spent the day immersed in color inspiration of one kind or another. With five week old Finn snug in my Ergo and the big kids excited about a Daddy day, I began the day at Fiddlehead Artisan Supply, my gorgeous local quilt shop, where Amy Butler, Heather Jones, Samantha Lindgren from A Gathering of Stitches, and the rest of the Quilter’s Color Weekend retreaters were having a visit.

heather jones and amy butler at fiddlehead artisan supply belfast maine
Heather Jones and Amy Butler browse the gorgeous displays at Fiddlehead Artisan Supply.

Walking into a quilt shop as gorgeous as Fiddlehead is inspiring in and of itself; walking into a quilt shop as gorgeous as Fiddlehead and packed with fabric, color, quilt-loving women made my heart happy and my inspiration cup runneth over. It was fun to see Heather again (we first met at QuiltCon), and meet Amy. I also got to meet Kerry Goulder from Kid Giddy, another Maine sewist with whom I’ve communicated via Instagram but had never met in person. There were snacks, book signings, chatting, and of course fabric buying!

Kerry of KidGiddy and Amy Butler sign their books at Fiddlehead Artisan Supply Belfast Maine
Kerry of Kid Giddy and Amy Butler signing their books at Fiddlehead.

After all of the retreaters swarmed back onto their bus to head back to their retreat haven, I spent some time catching up with Abby from Fiddlehead and selecting a new fabric bundle (stay tuned–you’ll hopefully see it later this week!). Of course, snuggling, nursing, and changing Finn peppered the day.

Next, we stopped in for a visit at the Quilter’s Color Weekend Retreat at Point Lookout in coastal Northport, Maine, only another 15 minutes from Fiddlehead. The weekend quilting retreat was one of the first of its kind in Maine, organized by Sam at A Gathering of Stitches, and it happened practically in my backyard (sooo exciting)! The location was stunning, and situated on the top of a mountain, it was peaceful as well as having amazing views. I have never been to a quilt retreat before, but even spending an hour in that room with a bunch of happily sewing, newly inspired, and eagerly learning women was enough to convince me that quilting retreats are where it’s at. I definitely absorb positive energy by being around excited, inspired, colorful quilters, and living in rural Maine, my chances at surrounding myself with such people are rare. This day was a treat for sure!

color stories inspiration
Color stories created by one of the retreat-goers.
finn snuggling at the retreat
Kerry snuggled Finn for a while so that I could walk around to see the inspiring creating taking place.
sewing retreat a gathering of stitches
Sewing and chatting and laughing and creating and soaking it in.
quilt retreat maine
Heather Jones and Sam Lindgren, sharing their wisdom.
amy butler
Amy Butler and a retreat-goer talk quilting.
baby quilt
Even Finn had a good time! (Kerry shows off her progress while Finn happily wiggles).
point lookout maine quilt retreat
The gorgeous view from the dining room at the retreat. Bliss!

After getting my quiltspiration fill for the day, Finn and I headed home and met the rest of our family in Belfast for a quilt photo shoot (you’ll have to wait until September to see those photos, though!). It was a busy but inspiring and refreshing quilt-fabric-color-filled day!

After stopping in at the Quilter’s Color Weekend Retreat, I’m even more excited about the next AGOS retreat in a few weeks: Slow Stitching Retreat at Medomak Retreat Center in Washington, Maine with Carolyn Friedlander, Chawne Kimber, and of course Sam. As she so eloquently states, Sam envisions this retreat as a “long weekend full of the lush, yet cool, woods of Maine as the backdrop for an enthusiastic group of stitchers sharing their knowledge, their ideas, and their practice.” You can read more of her reflections on Slow Stitching HERE, as well as more about this idyllic four day retreat.

With a little babe and an extended family visit overlap, I sadly cannot attend the entire retreat, as much as I would LOVE to. I am hoping to find a way to go for at least a day, though. This summer, especially with a newborn, I’ve been very much embracing the slow stitching idea, learning embroidery, playing with EPP, and taking the time to do hand quilting. It’s no secret how much I love Carolyn Friedlander’s work, and to get the chance to explore, learn, and share techniques and ideas not only with her, but also Chawne and Sam sounds amazing. I can only imagine how blissfully serene it would be to spend four unplugged days stitching, relaxing, and enjoying the Maine woods in the best of company. If you go, will you send some of your slow stitching bliss my way!? Thank you!

June Goal {ALYoF}: Summer Stitching

I completely missed May for A Lovely Year of Finishes (ALYoF). It actually is a good thing, since I was going to make my goal “have a baby“. Here we are in June and I still have not had this baby, which means I wouldn’t have had a successful finish to link up anyway! (Enter: haveyouhadthatbabyyet.com)

For June, my goal is to have this baby! He absolutely must make his way out by the end of the month (fingers crossed for by the end of the week!)  Since I know that I need to have some little quilting/stitching project in the works, too, I’m also going to make another small goal: to finish piecing the top of the English Paper Pieced table runner I started last summer.

Summer table runner EPP project goalWhile going through my mental list of old works in progress I could dig out and make a bit of progress on while waiting for this baby, I mentally stumbled upon my Sweet as Honey EPP table runner. I realized that the color scheme is exactly the same as my newly started summer placemats, and decided it would be the perfect handwork project to add to my active to-do pile.

When I last left off on this EPP project, I was planning on making the next row of honeycombs either orange or yellow. In looking at the bundle of fabric for my placemats next to the project, I am going to take a design turn and make the next row of honeycombs for the center Lucy Boston block (the one shown on the right, below) in the dark blue. Then, I plan on making a bunch of 1″ squares (or maybe more honeycombs?) with which to border each of the blocks before joining them together in a row and binding.

Color planning for the outer row and borders of table runner
Border option 1: burnt orange
Color planning for the outer row and borders of table runner
Border option 2: medium blue

I’m planning to buy a little extra yardage of one of the Moda Bella Solids from the August bundle from Fiddlehead Artisan Supply to complete the border squares, and am leaning toward option 2 above: the medium blue. I’m excited and think that this table runner will go really well with my pixelated summer placemats.

summer placemats planningThis is only a rough visualization of a placemat, but I’m excited at the potential outcome. It looks like even with only 8 colors, the aesthetic works for me.  I love that each placemat will be different, and I am looking forward to playing around with color placement. For this progress shot, the half square triangles (HST) aren’t squared up or sewn together yet, and I may make a bunch more and play around with layouts before sewing them together. According to my initial math, I will be able to make a set of six (6) placemats with my bundle of 8 FQs. I may buy another bundle just to be safe.

In lieu of the popular “feet in the photo” quilt shot, here’s my 41+ weeks pregnant version, posted on Instagram a few days ago (and in posting this, I’m realizing I laid out the bottom row backwards in the photo above!):

pregnant belly quilt shotI’m linking up with the June Goal Making party for A Lovely Year of Finishes, with a goal of having a baby (and maybe finishing the EPP piecing for the table runner top as icing on the cake). I’m also linking up with Monday Makers & Design Wall.

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Sponsor News:

For those of you who want to get your hands on an August bundle like the one I’m using for the placemats, use coupon code nightquilter15% to get 15% off your entire order from Fiddlehead Artisan Supply‘s online shop from now through June 21st.

Thank you for supporting my sponsors!

 

 

 

Kicking off Summer

Today I cut into a gorgeous bundle of Bella Solids that just screams summer. I’m beginning a new project, since my baby boy has yet to make his arrival and I amazingly have completed my other big pre-baby sewing project goals. Plus, Memorial Day, the unofficial start of summer, is a perfect day to begin a summer project, right? My plan is to make a set of six (6) placemats, since we have a surprising lack of quilted home accessories.

Fiddlehead Moda Bella Solids August FQ bundleI bought this bundle of Moda Bella Solids, called “August”, at Fiddlehead Artisan Supply when I went in to choose the bundle I gave away for the Sew Mama Sew Giveaway Day. The hot days of summer were still teasing us, and I couldn’t resist the summery feel of these colors together. (For those of you who want to get your hands on this bundle, too, the coupon code nightquilter15% will get you 15% off all online orders from Fiddlehead between now and June 21st!)

summer quilted placemat project startI’m hoping to make these placemats using a prismatic half square triangle (HST) style inspired by these quilts by Nydia Kehnle:

Nydia Kehnle quilts inspiration
These two quilts by Nydia Kehnle are inspiration for my placemat design.

Nydia’s advice for making quilts like this was to use MANY different colors to allow a smooth gradation. I know that since the fabric bundle I’m using has only eight colors, my placemats will have a more jumpy color transition, but I’m hoping that they still look cool. I love the transitions of yellows and blues, and hope the jump between the two can be smooth or at least look intentionally jumpy. Time will tell!

moda bella solids august bundle at fiddlehead artisan supplyI’ve only cut one strip from each fat quarter to start, and plan to pair up HSTs and try a test layout before cutting the fabric for all six placemats.

I’m hoping this will be a good project to continue after my baby is born, too, since I can do it in little bits. Cut a little, sleep, snuggle, nurse, pair a little, sleep, snuggle, nurse, sew a little, sleep, snuggle, nurse, cut a little, sleep snuggle, nurse, repeat.

I’m linking up with Monday Makers–who has some freshly made placemats to show off–, Design Wall, and Molli’s Sunday Stash (again, if I can link more than one post a week!).